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Friday, October 10
 

9:00am

Opening Plenary Session --Knowledge to Go
As educators, we all hope our students will acquire “knowledge to go,” not just knowledge for the exam or the term paper. We envision our students thinking insightfully with what they have learned as they cast a vote, analyze a potential investment, nourish a personal relationship, or advance a project at their place of work. Such a vision poses genuine challenges for today's education. It calls for choosing and framing content carefully to support later insight and practical action. It calls for patterns of teaching and learning that foster thinking flexibly with what's learned, not just thinking about it well. Happily, several trends in contemporary education demonstrate many schools' and educators' commitment to knowledge to go. In this talk, David Perkins offers insight into what's needed and what's already happening.

Presenters
avatar for David N. Perkins

David N. Perkins

Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
David Perkins is the Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr., Research Professor of Teaching and Learning at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, recently retired from the Senior Faculty. He has conducted long-term programs of research and development in the areas of teaching and learning for... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 9:00am - 10:15am
Theater
  • Room Theater

10:15am

AM BREAK
Friday October 10, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

10:45am

Cultivating Ethical Sensitivity in the Digital Age: Ideas and Tools from the Good Play Project
How do we create space for reflecting on questions of morality, ethics, and social responsibility in our fast paced lives? How do we support young people to think about these issues, and to confront moral and ethical dilemmas as they participate in social media sites, such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter? These are the kinds of questions at the heart of Project Zero’s Good Play Project.  In this Special Interest Session, Carrie James will engage participants in a conversation about these issues and share related ideas and tools developed by Good Project researchers.

Presenters
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 11:30am
Music Room
  • Room Music Room

10:45am

Leading a Culture of Thinking and Supporting Change
Creating a culture of thinking across a school is much more than getting teachers to incorporate a few thinking routines into their practice. This session will explore the four key areas that leaders—teacher-leaders, curriculum specialists, heads of department and principals—need to attend to in supporting change. We will discuss some of the successful practices schools around the world have employed and identify some of the challenges that arise as a school embraces the idea of becoming a culture of thinking.

Presenters
avatar for Ron Ritchhart

Ron Ritchhart

Principal Investigator, HGSE Project Zero
Ron Ritchhart is a Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Harvard Project Zero where his work focuses on the development of school and classroom culture as prime vehicles for developing students’ as powerful thinkers and learners.  Ron’s most recent book, Creating... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 11:30am
Room C
  • Room Room C

10:45am

Qualities of Effective Professional Learning Communities
A marker of effective learning communities is the quality of conversations among its members—how they learn from and with one another in their everyday interactions. This session will feature emerging research at Project Zero about the types of language professionals use to best support the learning of their colleagues.

Presenters
avatar for Daniel Wilson

Daniel Wilson

Director, Project Zero
Dr. Daniel Wilson is the Director of Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE). He is a Principal Investigator at Project Zero, a Lecturer at HGSE, Faculty for the Doctorate for Educational Leadership program at HGSE, and the Educational Chair at Harvard’s... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 11:30am
Theater
  • Room Theater

10:45am

Slow Looking
Slow looking means taking the time to carefully observe more than meets the eye. It involves lingering, looking long, and purposefully going beyond first impressions.  Several PZ frameworks emphasize slow looking. This session explores how slow looking supports complex cognition, and introduces some strategies for teaching slow looking.

Presenters
avatar for Shari Tishman

Shari Tishman

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
Shari Tishman is a Lecturer at Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Senior Research Associate at Harvard Project Zero, where she recently served as Director. Her research focuses on the development of thinking and understanding, the role of close observation in learning, and... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 11:30am
Dance Studio
  • Room Dance Studio

10:45am

The Good Project: Promoting Excellence, Engagement and Ethics in Young People
In this session, we will focus on the practical applications of the Good Project, developed to encourage young people to think about, articulate and reflect on excellence, ethics and engagement in their work and lives. Moving from theory to practice, the Good Project has developed materials such as the GoodWork Toolkit, the Collaboration Toolkit, and the Family Dinner Four-Week Program for educators, parents and others to create opportunities for important discussions with young people about the way they choose to spend time and approach work. After a brief introduction to some of these materials, participants can discuss how they may use them in their own settings and ask related questions about development and implementation.

Presenters
WF

Wendy Fischman

Project Manager, Project Zero


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 11:30am
Room A
  • Room Room A

10:45am

What is Agency by Design?
Agency by Design is a multi-year research project exploring the promises and pedagogies of maker-centered learning. Join a member of the research team in a discussion about the core questions guiding this research, the methods for exploration, and some emergent findings around maker-centered practices.

Presenters
JR

Jen Ryan

Researcher, Project Manager, Project Zero


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 11:30am
Tech Arts Studio 1
  • Room Tech Arts Studio 1

10:45am

Cultural Humility: A Foundational Disposition for Building Intercultural Relationships
In this course, participants will explore the foundational disposition of cultural humility, which enables educators and students to approach intercultural relationships through a reflective and humble stance. Cultural humility is a new concept in the field of education that has many contributions to offer to the areas of global and cultural competence, intercultural learning, multicultural education and culturally responsive pedagogy. Cultural humility requires that individuals engage humbly in a lifelong commitment to self-reflection and self-critique; address power imbalances that exist in communication; and develop mutually caring, respectful, and trusting intercultural relationships (Tervalon & Murray-Garcia, 1998; Hodgin, 2014). This course will share key findings from a qualitative research study exploring the dimensions of cultural humility in an urban public school setting with secondary school teachers and students building relationships across racial and cultural differences (Hodgin, 2014). In addition, participants will reflect on and discuss the elements of cultural humility and the implications for their own work and educational settings.

Presenters
avatar for Erica Hodgin

Erica Hodgin

Associate Director, Civic Engagement Research Group
Erica Hodgin is the Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Research Group (CERG) at Mills College and the Research Director of the Educating for Participatory Politics project -- an action group of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 3
  • Room Room 3

10:45am

Designing for Disaster: Bringing Global Issues into the Curriculum
Natural disaster mitigation has and always will be a dynamic challenge addressed by city planners, engineers, architects, builders, municipal leaders and the average homeowner. Disasters such as rain from hurricanes, wind from tornadoes, flooding from storm surge, and shaking from earthquakes have the potential to alter the built environment on each of the seven continents. This course will demonstrate lesson plans and activities from "Designing for Disaster," the National Building Museum's teaching kit. The program teaches students mitigating practices employed by design professionals and pairs the learning with hands on-activities including building a model shear wall, mapping a small town for flood prevention, and handling actual construction materials. Participants will do hands-on work I this course, as students do, and will also examine profiles of already built structures from around the globe that are disaster resilient in design and/or construction.

Presenters
avatar for Timothy Wright

Timothy Wright

Manager of Teacher Engagement, Nation Building Museum
Timothy Wright is the Manager of Teacher Engagement at the National Building Museum. He is responsible for planning and managing all programming for preK to 12th grade educators by implementing professional development workshops, producing classroom teaching resources such as curriculum... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Wood Shop
  • Room Woodshop

10:45am

Do-It-Together: An Exploration of Creativity and Collaboration in Maker-Centered Learning Environments
The contemporary maker movement has been described as a return to the DIY (do-it-yourself) movement of the 1960s and ‘70s. Now, as then, the proposed benefits of engaging children in DIY learning experiences range from heightened expertise in STEM subjects to increased creative capacities for young people. While few makers and educators would argue against the content-area and creativity-based learning outcomes associated with DIY activities, some, such as Make magazine columnist David Lang, have suggested that the “DIY” moniker is in itself a misnomer for maker-centered learning: Making isn’t about doing things oneself; instead, it is about collectively engaging in innovation networks together. During this hands-on course, Project Zero researcher Edward Clapp will engage participants in a series of fast-paced design challenges that emphasize the do-it-together nature of maker-centered learning experiences. The ultimate goal is to provide participants with first-hand experience in group-based creative problem-solving activities, while also offering strategies for incorporating these activities—and others like them—into an array of learning environments.

Presenters
avatar for Edward Clapp

Edward Clapp

Senior Research Manager, Project Zero
Edward P. Clapp is a senior research manager and a member of the core research team working on the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative—an investigation of the promises, practices, and pedagogies of maker-centered learning—at Project Zero, an educational research center at the Harvard... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Physics
  • Room Physics

10:45am

Flattening the Globe: The Challenge and Beauty of Multiple Perspectives
How do we represent our 3D earth in two dimensions? In this session, participants will engage in a mathematical/artistic problem-solving project that has multiple solutions. Using the eight creative strategies found in contemporary arts practice and the precision of math, participants will think through and execute a process of flattening a 3D globe to a 2D map. All maps are distorted and offer ways of understanding bias and systems thinking of social complexities. This course will demonstrate how to use maps to tell a narrative from different points of view. The practice of remodeling and recontextualizing the globe will open and extend the ways we use mathematical practices to advance our creative inquiry. In addition to gaining an understanding of the purpose of commonly used map projections (cylindrical, conical, planar, and interrupted projections), participants will create new maps that expose our personal stories, perspectives and identities grounded in the mathematical practices and creative strategies for critically engaging in this work. The presenters will make reference to principles from Project Zero research into teaching for understanding, studio habits of mind and making learning visible.

Presenters
ML

Mariah Landers

Director, Integrated Learning Specialist Program, Alameda County Office of Education
TP

Tamar Posner

President, Mathaction.org


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 6
  • Room Room 6

10:45am

Flip History!: Personalized Inquiry into History through Unpacking a Modern Memorial
The overall goal of this course is for participants to understand how they can develop an entire inquiry unit on a historical period by looking at a memorial today. The intended inquiry will flip the traditional teaching of history towards an inquiry-based approach led by the learners. Participants will interactively ‘unpack’ a historical event or historical period by actively exploring a historic memorial. They will virtually explore the memorial making their thinking visible using a Project Zero thinking routine and then create their own concept questions. The course will conclude by having participants design their own memorial.

Presenters
AH

Arndt Häfele

Grade 5 teacher / Grade Level Leader Grade 5, Atlanta International School


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Art Studio
  • Room Art Studio

10:45am

Helping Youth Navigate in the Digital Age: A Whole-Community Approach to Digital Citizenship
Students grow up in a digital world with potential for enhanced communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creation. Yet schools face challenges with ethical issues that arise from students’ use of technology, such as cyberbullying, inappropriate sharing and plagiarism. Digital citizenship includes a range of essential 21st century skills, i.e., students learn to think critically, behave safely and participate responsibly in our digital world. In this course, learn how to take a whole-community approach to digital citizenship at your school, building a positive culture around technology. Learn the myths and the realities of how tweens and teens are participating with digital media, based on research on digital ethics from Project Zero’s Good Play Project. Next, learn the components of the “three-legged stool” for a whole-community approach to digital citizenship, including an overview of Common Sense Media’s free K-12 Digital Literacy & Citizenship Curriculum. Participants will explore lesson plans, see how to weave digital citizenship into different subject areas, and understand how to use the design thinking process to give students a voice and a sense of agency, all the while supporting Common Core and ISTE standards. Participants will also see applications of digital citizenship with examples from a middle school Digital Citizenship Certified Educator from the Bay Area, including school-wide projects on digital citizenship and ethics, and classroom-based examples of how to use design thinking to explore the civic, moral, and ethical opportunities and challenges afforded by the digital age. Lastly, participants will work collaboratively and independently to develop their own plan addressing digital citizenship at their school.

Presenters
avatar for Jessica Lura

Jessica Lura

Curriculum Coodinator, Bullis Charter School
I have been an educator for 17 years and have taught 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 8th grades. I am passionate about technology, learning by doing, children's books, and the environment. I currently work at a Bullis Charter School in the SF Bay Area.
avatar for Kelly Mendoza

Kelly Mendoza

Sr. Director, Education Programs, Common Sense Education
Kelly Mendoza oversees digital citizenship education content and strategy for Common Sense Education, including the Digital Citizenship Curriculum, interactive games, and online professional development. Her goal is to create curricula and programs that help students think critically... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Lower Bio/Chem
  • Room Lower Biology/Chemistry

10:45am

Making Paper Circuits: The Vital Role of Process in Maker Activities
In this hands-on course, participants will learn to combine papercraft techniques with friendly, accessible electronics materials such as copper tape, flat batteries and bead-like LED lights. This paper circuits activity will set the stage for a conversation about capturing process as a built-in part of a maker activity. With paper circuits built into a project notebook or other physical timeline, incremental “sketches” and experiments can double as functional, personalized tools to refer back to. Throughout the course, we will reflect on examples of intersections of craft and technology as both a creative “way in” to technical topics, and a “way out,” connecting material back to students’ passions.

Presenters
avatar for Natalie Freed

Natalie Freed

Computer Science Teacher, Lick-Wilmerding High School


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Electronics
  • Room Electronics

10:45am

Making Thinking Visible in the Science Classroom
How do you know that your students don't leave your evolution unit still thinking that a lizard camouflages with a branch because it plans and wants to blend with its environment? This course will showcase various methods of making thinking and learning visible in the science classroom. Popular and widely used curricula for labs and activities are often educational but can be very prescriptive. Students don't play as much of a role as they could in noticing patterns and phenomena, documenting their rudimentary thoughts and explanations, developing their own questions and constructing their own knowledge. In this course, participants will experience and discuss various strategies for helping students track and reflect upon the evolution of their thinking and learning about science concepts. In all of the examples, there is a requisite element of pushing students to consider practical, ethical and global implications

Presenters
avatar for Carrie Maslow

Carrie Maslow

Science Teacher/ Science Department Chair, Lick-Wilmerding High School
Carrie Maslow has taught Biology, Anatomy and Physiology and Psychology at the high school level for over a decade. She began her teaching career in an outdoor school and always strives to make learning as experiential and student-centered as possible. Carrie earned her undergraduate... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Upper Chemistry
  • Room Upper Chemistry

10:45am

Nurturing Global Competence Through the Use of Global Thinking Routines
The challenge is clear: The most pressing problems of our time—from climate change to mass migration, human rights to equitable economic development—demand global awareness and collaboration. They demand that we educate our youth to investigate complex topics of global significance, to recognize and seek to understand a variety of perspectives, to communicate across difference and, when appropriate, to take informed action. How can we transform our classrooms into spaces where students engage with the contemporary world beyond their immediate environment? For decades, researchers at Project Zero have examined the role of thinking routines in the promotion of cultures of thinking and thinking dispositions. In this course, we explore a novel approach to thinking routines—global thinking routines—specifically designed to advance learners’ (children as well as adults) global competence. Through a combination of brief presentations, small group work and class discussion of student work and contemporary issues, participants will develop their understanding of what global competence is, what it might look like, and why it matters today. Participants will gain firsthand experience of global thinking routines and have the opportunity to think with other educators about how they might be used in creating globally-minded classroom cultures and advancing students’ (and teachers’) global competence.

Presenters
avatar for Melissa Rivard

Melissa Rivard

Senior Project Manager, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Melissa Rivard is Senior Project Manager on the Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) initiative, supporting the Center’s strategy for creating and testing new innovations. She is the project lead for the Washington and Georgia state innovation clusters, in addition to supporting the addition of new projects to the Center’s FOI portfolio. Melissa joined the Center in December 2015. Prior to coming to the Center, she worked at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education as a Project Manager and Pedagogical Documen... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Library
  • Room Library

10:45am

Thinking, Understanding and Reflecting Through Art and Literature
Learning thrives when students’ thinking is made visible and when there is time for student collaboration. This interactive course will give participants the opportunity to experience and learn about how using thinking routines with art and literature can enhance students’ thinking, understanding and reflection in an elementary classroom setting. Viewing documentation of student learning as they use these routines, participants will develop a sense of the way these students progress in their understanding of the theme "Risks and Consequences" and in the process gain an understanding of their own and others' perspectives, while developing respect and empathy for others.

Presenters
avatar for Tabbatha O'Donnell

Tabbatha O'Donnell

Upper Elementary Division Lead, Meyer Academy
Tabbatha O’Donnell is an elementary teacher with over 20 years of experience in grades K-5. She began her teaching career in Hawaii where she immersed in Hawaii’s multicultural environment, leading to a unique approach and sensitivity to teaching with a global perspective. Currently... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 8
  • Room Room 8

10:45am

Using Stories to Incite Passion, Emotions, Relationships and Inspiration in Student Learning
This interactive session will engage participants directly in the processes of inciting deep learning through passion, emotions, relationships and inspiration. Using a variety of thinking routines, connected through video, audio and written stories, participants will experience deep learning and meaning making. Throughout the session, the presenters, instructional leaders in a public school district in Michigan, will identify the cultural forces that exist in every classroom, helping participants understand the need to attend to these in deliberate ways. Participants can use the format of, information from, and structure of the session to recreate a learning environment that incites deep learning.

Presenters
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
SR

Shawn Ryan

Deputy Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 9
  • Room Room 9

10:45am

We Make Makers
The Albemarle County Public School District is engaged in creating a maker mindset systemically across 26 schools through integration of design agency using learning space redesign, pedagogical entrepreneurial invention, and P-based learning (passion, projects and problem-solving) processes. Participants in this course will experience design thinking that allows them to "DIY" their own internal processes for scaling the ideas of maker learning in their own classroom, library, grade level, department, school or district, walking out with at least one idea for change that could happen within 24-48 hours in their own learning spaces The preseenters will refer to inspiration from IDEO, the D-School, and their own district's Seven Pathways to Transformational Learning, all of which support a "search, connect, communicate and make," post-Gutenberg learning approach, in contrast to standardization of the Gutenberg model grounded in "write, print, read, listen and recall" teaching approaches.

Presenters
avatar for Pam Moran

Pam Moran

superintendent, Albemarle County Public Schools
I am superintendent in Albemarle County Public Schools in Virginia. We are a school district with a progressive education ethos and believe in creating pathways for contemporary learners to design, create, make, engineer, build, and share as they learn together. We have 26 schools... Read More →
IS

Ira Socol

Design Project Manager, Albemarle County Public Schools


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 11
  • Room Room 11

10:45am

“Think Critically, Act Creatively”: Harnessing the Imagination for Real World Change
This course is a future-focused experience highlighting the power of stories as tools for fostering civic imagination and inspiring real world change. The workshop reflects ongoing efforts by USC’s Media, Activism & Participatory Politics (MAPP) Project to integrate peer-based learning, popular culture and media production into civic learning pathways. Specifically, participants will go through an exercise of building a future world in which both real and fantastical solutions to social inequality are possible. Working backwards, the participants then break into smaller groups to share insights and build on these to brainstorm character-based narratives of social change. After story-boarding these narratives, participants plan how these narratives could be created, produced and shared in service of concrete civic goals. The workshop also employs an online media library being developed by MAPP as a resource for educators in high school civics classes, after school programs, and activist organizations. The library combines original media produced by activist groups, critical reflections from participants and curricular resources. As they use the library to engage with existing examples of civic media, workshop participants will be modeling ways the online tool can be used to help students master core skills necessary for effectively harnessing digital media tools and participatory politics practices towards changing the world.

Presenters
avatar for Gabriel Peters-Lazaro

Gabriel Peters-Lazaro

Media Design Lead, Media Arts + Practice, USC
As the Media Design Lead in the Division of Media Arts + Practice, Gabriel Peters-Lazaro researches, designs and produces digital media for innovative learning. He is a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Media Activism and Participatory Politics (MAPP) project and is currently... Read More →
SS

Sangita Shresthova Shresthova

Research Director, Civic Paths/USC


Friday October 10, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room D
  • Room Room D

11:30am

Strand A Lunch
Friday October 10, 2014 11:30am - 12:15pm
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

12:15pm

Connecting Global and Digital Literacy to Create a Generation of Engaged Young People
The course presenters, co-teachers from a public charter school in Pittsburgh, PA, will share ways they integrate their school’s guiding principles, place-based learning and technology to personalize curriculum. Having expert interviewers, TED Talks and marketing media serve as mentor “texts,” their students put to use core literacy skills to create their own communication platforms. Teachers engage students with non-fiction media and invite diverse local or global community stakeholders into their 2nd/3rd grade classroom. Using thinking routines and examining authentic resources, participants will explore ways to make curriculum relevant by brainstorming guiding questions and beginning to design adaptable models that incorporate sustainable partnerships and relevant media.

Presenters
VH

Vicky Hsieh

2-3 Literacy Looping Co-Teacher, Environmental Charter School at Frick Park
MV

Marissa Vogel

2-3 Literacy Looping Co-Teacher, Environmental Charter School at Frick Park


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room B
  • Room Room B

12:15pm

Connecting Today’s Knowledge with Tomorrow’s Success: Views from a Kindergarten Classroom
In the fall of 2010, Springfield Plains Elementary School in Clarkston, Michigan, embarked upon a journey of becoming a culture of thinking. Over the subsequent three years, the building principal and teachers deepened their knowledge and skill in fostering students’ thinking skills and dispositions. Included in these processes have been students’ personal reflections on their own learning via the Understanding Map, feedback from parents, teacher study groups, the use of protocols, community visits, partnerships with other schools, action research, and a focus on the eight cultural forces identified by Ron Ritchhart in the Cultures of Thinking Project. The presenters will take participants through their learning journey, engaging them in specific processes proven effective through practical experience.

Presenters
JF

Jan Finney

Kindergarten Teacher, Springfield Plains Elementary School
avatar for Nancy Mahoney

Nancy Mahoney

Principal, Springfield Plains Elementary School


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Computer Lab
  • Room Computer Lab

12:15pm

Creative Inquiry through Collaboration: A Performing Arts Approach to Group Learning
What can the performing arts teach us about inquiry-based learning in group settings? How is the act of using improvisation to generate group choreography similar to creative problem solving? In this course, through storytelling and physical theater participants will develop short performance pieces that integrate personal stories of mentorship into moving tableaus. As a group we will look at how inquiry-based learning frameworks, Studio Habits of Mind, and the act of ensemble building mutually inform one another. The course will focus on improvisation as creative problem-solving and the iterative nature of creative processes. We will also look at the role of video documentation and blogging in making the process of collaborative learning visible.

Presenters
IM

Indi McCasey

Apprentice Faculty, Integrated Learning Specialist Program
I believe in the transformative power of community-based arts education and I am a circus performer/teaching artist with over 20 years of experience teaching in informal learning environments and 10 years of non-profit program management experience. If you hang out with me long enough... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
The Center
  • Room The Center

12:15pm

Dream-It-Yourself
This course will explore the nexus of design, “making” and interdisciplinary learning by challenging participants to see through multiple disciplinary lenses and devise creative solutions to complex global challenges. This exploration will be based on approaches used in a worldwide, interdisciplinary idea development program called the ArtScience Prize. Participants will work in groups to solve a world issue by prototyping creative solutions using various materials (some of which may be unexpected!) in a series of short design challenges. Closing reflection activities will connect these activities back to Project Zero research and participants’ own experiences in educational environments. The course builds on conference themes of design thinking, “making” and the ways that these activities pave the way for new possibilities in thinking, understanding and empowerment. It will reframe the DIY mindset from Do-It-Yourself to Dream-It-Yourself, exploring the ways that making and prototyping can provide opportunities for learners to build agency by looking at world issues around them in new and unexpected ways.

Presenters
avatar for Andrea Sachdeva

Andrea Sachdeva

International Director of Education, ArtScience Prize
Andrea Sachdeva oversees all ArtScience Prize program sites, from Cambridge’s Home Office to cities in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Africa. Andrea is a founding co-chair of the Continuing the Conversation series of regional and national arts education events hosted by the... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 1
  • Room Room 1

12:15pm

Empowering Disenfranchised Learners: A Collaborative Approach to Making Thinking Verbal
In this session, we invite participants to construct shared knowledge, both figuratively and literally, as we develop the “head, heart, and hands of students," exploring ways to scaffold the development of metacognition, creativity, listening and speaking skills. A highly-engaging team approach to eliciting student discourse and thinking, Enbrighten, will be examined. Participants will make thinking verbal, exploring comprehension as a collaborative process of cognition, rather than something assessed by an isolated set of comprehension questions. As part of this process, learners will be encouraged to uncover complex issues of global significance from a variety of viewpoints. We will model and practice the language of reflective listening and collaborative discourse, demonstrating how students develop and generalize these habits. Participants will build with learning toolkits, document collective thinking, view classroom videos and engage in collective discussions.

Presenters
avatar for Erika Lusky

Erika Lusky

Special Educator, Instructional Coach, CCoT Online Learning Coach, Rochester Community Schools
I am passionate about creating quality relationships to foster agency and identity, specifically in disenfranchised learners. I am advocate for human connections, understanding, thinking, and student voice. I have been working for Rochester Community Schools in Michigan for over 20... Read More →
avatar for Julie Rains

Julie Rains

Information Literacy Specialist & AbD Online Course Instructor
Passionate about fostering positive interactions and relationships, I am committed to collaborating with students and teachers from around the world. It is a true joy to experiment, investigate, and grapple with ideas to encourage reflection from a variety of viewpoints. In addition... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 5
  • Room Room 5

12:15pm

Exploring the Role of Science in Interdisciplinary Learning
Teachers face many challenges when they endeavor to collaborate on projects that are truly interdisciplinary. This course will introduce some examples of: 1) how to integrate multiple disciplinary lenses into middle and high school science units, and 2) how to explore concepts while making connections through authentic learning opportunities among subject groups. We will also see how thinking routines, science and interdisciplinary approaches go hand-in-hand, as routines help to deepen understanding of the topic being explored and serve to challenge misconceptions. The intended results are that students begin to make local and global connections and create a community of global thinkers. Participants will see examples of student thinking in action and try out thinking routines as they are used in science classes.

Presenters
avatar for Emily Smith

Emily Smith

US Science Teacher, Washington International School
Emily Smith is an upper school Biology and TOK teacher at Washington International School. She is also a senior examiner for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. A DC-area native, Emily has been teaching in both public and International schools in various locations around... Read More →
KW

Kusum Wagle

MS Science Teacher, Washington International School
Kusum Waglé is the middle school science coordinator at Washington International School. She has attended Project Zero institutes and presented PZ ideas in practice at various conferences. She has taught sciences for the last 21 years and this year incorporated PZ researcher Tina... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Upper Biology
  • Room Upper Biology

12:15pm

How Leaders Can Shape a Culture of Thinking
This course will explore how a collaborative team of leaders can shape a culture of thinking by influencing teachers' instructional practice. Relying on the most current research and findings associated with Project Zero, school leaders in a Michigan public school district have explored, guided and influenced teachers' instruction with carefully planned strategies that are clear and responsive in order to help them increase the frequency of using thinking routines in their classrooms. Results from this evaluation will be used to make recommendations to school leadership as they seek to create a school that embraces a cultures of thinking philosophy and/or design additional methods for schools already embarked on this journey. Participants will examine case studies of classroom instruction and will learn by doing in this session.

Presenters
TB

Todd Bidlack

Principal, Rochester Community Schools/Delta Kelly Elementary
avatar for Jennifer Johnson

Jennifer Johnson

Assistant Principal, Clarkston Community Schools/Sashabaw Middle School


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 7
  • Room Room 7

12:15pm

Making Innovation Work with Young Students in the Classroom
In this course the presenters will share what they learned from the experience of teaching a first grade unit guided by the question, “How can we invent something to make our school community a better place?” They utilized the design process, documentation and reflection within the unit and made visible thinking and problem-solving central to the learning. Learn practical approaches to undertaking such a project in a whole-group classroom setting with young children (and without specialized tools). By the end of the unit, first graders had completed their own functioning class inventions and had the experience of being an innovator for their community. While the inventions (such as the Bathroom Bulb and Erasinator) may make us chuckle, they solved real first grade problems and were a true collaborative effort between the students and community partners showing that they can solve problems and help people through commitment and collaboration. Participants will learn by doing as well as reflect upon ways to encourage a “maker mindset” in young children.

Presenters
RM

Rachel Meyer

First Grade Teacher, The Environmental Charter School
JP

Jennifer Porter

First Grade Teacher, The Environmental Charter School


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 2
  • Room Room 2

12:15pm

Students and Teachers as Contemporary Artists: Using the Studio Thinking Framework to Shape Practice
Educators, Arzu Mistry and Todd Elkin believe there are many overlaps in the pro-active processes and meaning-making of contemporary artists, and the practices of progressive educators. In this course they will use the Studio Thinking Framework , created through research at Project Zero, as a lens for examining teacher and student practice in an arts-centered curriculum. The ‘Studio Habits of Mind’ give teachers and learners a culturally responsive common language to illuminate and describe moments of artistic thinking, reflection and learning, and can act as an effective lens for looking at and planning curriculum and assessment. The four ‘Studio Structures’ enable teachers to design powerful and deep classroom learning. In this course we will introduce the framework through arts experiences, share pictures of practice from student and teacher perspectives, and discuss the use of the framework in building contemporary arts practices from elementary to high school classrooms. Participants will explore how this framework can be used to support students in developing deep understanding across arts and other academic disciplines.


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Drafting and Design
  • Room Drafting and Design

12:15pm

Teacher Dispositions: How Maker Empowerment Starts with the Teacher
What do your teaching dispositions have to do with how your students understand the topics you teach? What is your own understanding of what you teach? How can maker and design thinking routines get you and your students to the heart of understanding? How do you know when your students are learning/understanding? In this course we’ll look at a typical lesson and adapt it. We’ll see how two maker routines can foster and promote deep understanding. In addition to creating engaging lessons, maker teachers also consider what tools, routines and materials inspire maker empowerment within their students. They find innovative ways to highlight the understanding as it’s taking place using PZ thinking routines and a plethora of documentation techniques. This course will inspire participants to approach Monday’s lessons differently.

Presenters
JE

Jenny Ernst

Park Day School, Park Day School
Teaching math and science with 6th graders at a progressive school has been a dream career. At this independent school in Oakland, my values around social justice have been cultivated through professional development to deeply understand my students and the world we live in. My latest... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 4
  • Room Room 4

12:15pm

Using Thinking Routines to Enhance Engagement and Deepen Learning
In this digital age, when experiences are often mediated by technology and when a barrage of images, text and sounds permeates our daily lives, it can feel profoundly rewarding to slow down and engage deeply in observation and conversation around a work of art. In this course, we will practice using Project Zero thinking routines to explore a few works of art to see how they can focus attention and encourage deep thinking. Thinking routines (a key component of Artful Thinking, Visible Thinking, Cultures of Thinking, and other Project Zero initiatives) are flexible, easy-to-learn strategies that support and promote rich thinking across various grade levels and content areas. We will use thinking routines to encourage the dispositions to observe, describe and wonder, and to uncover complex layers of meaning, through individual reflection and group discussion. This course will conclude with time to reflect on our own development of thinking and to brainstorm how these ideas can inspire classroom practice.

Presenters
avatar for Heidi Hinish

Heidi Hinish

Head, Gallery and Studio Learning, National Gallery of Art
Heidi Hinish is the head of the department of teacher, school, and family programs, in the division of education, at the National Gallery of Art, where she has worked since 1992.  As a museum educator, Heidi develops, teaches, and assesses programs and resources for children and... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Music Room
  • Room Music Room

12:15pm

When Our Learners are Teachers: Using a Learning Lab Approach to Create a Culture That Supports Professional Learning for Teachers
This course is designed to demonstrate how Teacher Learning Labs can be cultures of thinking that provide a powerful forum for professional learning. Participants in this session will explore the power of protocols and thinking routines for teachers who are participants in a non-judgmental learning experience that includes a ‘real time’ observation in a classroom. Throughout the course, thinking routines will be used to explore concepts such as the protocols for classroom observation; exploration of non-judgmental teacher language; and the impact of interactions and relationships both within the classroom and the teacher learning lab. Participants will discuss a professional reading related to job-embedded professional learning and view video footage of a classroom lab experience as well as the facilitated dialogue of teachers in a ‘learning lab’ setting.

Presenters
PN

Phyllis Ness

Elementary Literacy Specialist and Reading/Writing Subject Area Coordinator, Clarkston Community School
Phyllis is passionate about literacy. Throughout the past few years she has had the wonderful fortune of sharing her knowledge of effective reading and writing instruction with fellow educators through a Job Embedded Professional Learning approach. Literacy learning labs that Phyllis... Read More →
SP

Staci Puzio

Administrator, Instructional Technology, Testing and Evaluation, Clarkston Community School


Friday October 10, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 10
  • Room Room 10

12:45pm

Strand B Lunch
Friday October 10, 2014 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

1:30pm

Artful Thinking in the Classroom
Artful Thinking is a framework that can be used by educators in any discipline, with any age level. Two broad goals of the program include: 1) helping educators create rich connections between works of art and curricular topics; and 2) using art as a force for developing students’ thinking dispositions. We invite educators who often use art in their teaching as well as those who have never tried (but might be interested) to join a conversation where we will share practical entry points for bringing an Artful Thinking approach into your classroom or school.

Presenters
avatar for Jessica Ross

Jessica Ross

Researcher/Practioner, Project Zero
Jessica Ross is a senior practitioner specialist working at Project Zero on the Agency by Design Project.  Jessica was a founding team member of the Global Learning Charter Public School, where she taught grade 5-8 humanities for ten years.  A licensed principal, she has also served... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 11
  • Room Room 11

1:30pm

Documenting Student and Teacher Learning
The documentation practices developed in the world-renowned preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, have inspired educators around the world and profoundly influenced practices at Project Zero as a result of a two decade-long collaboration with Reggio educators. Come hear about the ways PZ researchers and their collaborators have translated these practices into a variety of early childhood through secondary school settings in the U.S. and discuss ways you might use documentation to support learning in your own teaching practice.

Presenters
avatar for Melissa Rivard

Melissa Rivard

Senior Project Manager, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Melissa Rivard is Senior Project Manager on the Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) initiative, supporting the Center’s strategy for creating and testing new innovations. She is the project lead for the Washington and Georgia state innovation clusters, in addition to supporting the addition of new projects to the Center’s FOI portfolio. Melissa joined the Center in December 2015. Prior to coming to the Center, she worked at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education as a Project Manager and Pedagogical Documen... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Library
  • Room Library

1:30pm

Engaging Youth in Participatory Politics in the Digital Age
A challenge schools and educators frequently wrestle with is how to prepare all youth equitably to participate meaningfully and effectively in civic and political life in the digital age. Hear from a PZ researcher working with educators implementing new curricula to engage youth in digital participatory politics. Come share your ideas about meeting this challenge!

Presenters
MR

Margaret Rundle

Research Project Specialist, Project Zero
Margaret Rundle is a Research Project Specialist on the Good Participation Project, the Educating for Participatory Politics Project, and the Good Collaboration Project at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research interests include human development through... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 3
  • Room Room 3

1:30pm

Leading a Culture of Thinking and Supporting Change
Creating a culture of thinking across a school is much more than getting teachers to incorporate a few thinking routines into their practice. This session will explore the four key areas that leaders—teacher-leaders, curriculum specialists, heads of department and principals—need to attend to in supporting change. We will discuss some of the successful practices schools around the world have employed and identify some of the challenges that arise as a school embraces the idea of becoming a culture of thinking.

Presenters
avatar for Ron Ritchhart

Ron Ritchhart

Principal Investigator, HGSE Project Zero
Ron Ritchhart is a Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Harvard Project Zero where his work focuses on the development of school and classroom culture as prime vehicles for developing students’ as powerful thinkers and learners.  Ron’s most recent book, Creating... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room C
  • Room Room C

1:30pm

Out of Eden Learn at Project Zero
Come find out more about one of Project Zero's newer projects, designed to accompany journalist Paul Salopek's epic seven-year walk around the world. Infused with Project Zero learning principles, our free online learning community invites educators and young people to slow down to observe the world carefully and to listen attentively to others; to exchange stories about people, place and identity; and to reflect on how their own lives connect to bigger human stories.

Presenters
avatar for Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Principal Investigator, Project Zero
I've been playing a leading role with Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero's new online learning community to accompany journalist Paul Salopek's epic walk around the world. I'm a former history teacher and I'm particularly interested in making history and social studies more personally... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room 6
  • Room Room 6

1:30pm

What Does a Developmentally-Appropriate Maker Space for Young Children Look Like?
When we think of maker spaces, we don't always think about the early childhood years--but maybe we should. Join educators from the Bay Area Discovery Museum to explore the design and implementation of a developmentally-appropriate maker space for young children. This session will give attendees the opportunity to share ideas about this exciting new venture.

Presenters
ER

Elizabeth Rood

VP of Education Strategy, Bay Area Discovery Museum
BV

Brandy Vause

Bay Area Discovery Museum


Friday October 10, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Lower Bio/Chem
  • Room Lower Bio/Chem

2:15pm

PM BREAK
Friday October 10, 2014 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

2:30pm

Artful Thinking and Making in the Classroom
The specific goal of the Artful Thinking program is to help teachers regularly use works of visual art and music in their curriculum in ways that strengthen student thinking and deepen disciplinary learning. Like all Visible Thinking initiatives at Project Zero, the Artful Thinking program emphasizes thinking dispositions, thinking routines and documentation of student thinking. This course introduces participants to the Artful Thinking program and instructional resources. Through activities and demonstrations, participants will think broadly about how viewing and making art can connect to a variety of curricular topics. Participants will also explore how the complex thinking that occurs naturally in the arts can inform students’ and teachers’ understanding of thinking in general. Using examples of visual art, objects, poetry and primary source documents, audience members will participate in thinking routines, art making and discussion of the potential curriculum connections for Artful Thinking in their own practice.

Presenters
avatar for Jessica Ross

Jessica Ross

Researcher/Practioner, Project Zero
Jessica Ross is a senior practitioner specialist working at Project Zero on the Agency by Design Project.  Jessica was a founding team member of the Global Learning Charter Public School, where she taught grade 5-8 humanities for ten years.  A licensed principal, she has also served... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 11
  • Room Room 11

2:30pm

Articulation and Reflection: Keys to Encouraging Deep Thinking in Our Youngest Students
Have you ever considered how you approach the creation and cultivation of your classroom culture? As members of a learning community, we should be considering what types of activities, projects and assignments will really make a difference in the educational experiences of our students. How can students feel safe enough to share their ideas, connections, predictions and opinions? How can elementary students reflect in a manner that is profound and deep? In this course, participants will explore how teachers and students can go from being partners to being owners of their learning—in age-appropriate ways.How do students approach learning? Are they engaged? Are they self-motivated? Will they be able to continue even if and when the teacher is not there? Using Project Zero ideas and routines, this course will explore how teachers can use articulation and reflection to help create classrooms that value and encourage deep thinking in our youngest students.

Presenters
avatar for Denise Coffin

Denise Coffin

Kindergarten Teacher, Sidwell Friends School
Denise Coffin teaches Kindergarten at Sidwell Friends School. She has been using Thinking Routines and other Project Zero ideas in her classroom for the past five years. She has been a presenter/exhibitor at several Looking at Student/Teacher Thinking exhibitions in Washington and... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 2
  • Room Room 2

2:30pm

Building, Dwelling, Thinking
Participants in this course will be actively involved in a dynamic design and fabrication environment that will highlight Lick-Wilmerding High School’s “Head, Heart and Hands“ philosophy and specifically will examine the Technical Arts Department’s emphasis on habits of mind. In small groups paired with two student facilitators, participants will engage in rapid design exercises while student facilitators transform the generated ideas into both computer drawings and physical models via laser cutting, CNC machining as well as traditional woodworking equipment. In addition groups will be led through a quick examination of past LWHS student work with equal emphasis on design presentation material, models, fabrication samples and finished objects.

Presenters
DH

Doug Hellikson

Technical Arts Faculty, Lick Wilmerding High School


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wood Shop
  • Room Woodshop

2:30pm

Children's Innovation Project: Learning Impact of Observational Drawing
The Children's Innovation Project aims to engage young children in broad interdisciplinary learning, with a focus on creative exploration, expression and innovation with technology. Children explore and learn about electricity and simple circuits through hands-on engagement with a kit of components designed for young hands. Children make connections to objects in their world—specifically through imagining about the insides of toys, opening them to notice carefully, identifying components and then repurposing and reconfiguring their internal components into new circuits. In addition, connections are made to other content areas such as writing, arts, vocabulary, mathematics and social studies, strengthening and extending children's learning. Through these processes, children are empowered with new relationships and understandings of the world around them, and learn a new set of expressive tools. This course will focus specifically on the establishment and development of a sustained practice of observational drawing in the kindergarten classroom. We will explore the progression and development of this practice and give specific examples of its extensions, both throughout a kindergarten learning progression, where we can see it develop into fluency with visual symbolic language (schematics), and in subesquent years. This course will balance hands-on workshop activities with presentation and discussion.

Presenters
JB

Jeremy Boyle

Assistant Professor of Art, Clarion University of PA
Artist/musician Jeremy Boyle was a founding member of the Chicago group Joan of Arc and has performed music (both solo and collaborative) throughout the United States, Canada and Japan. He has exhibited artwork, most of which is sound and technology based, in major cities across the... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Butler

Melissa Butler

Director, Children's Innovation Project
I'm a writer, educator and researcher. I consultant with schools interested in deepening students' thinking and approach to learning with digital and analog technologies. I focus on joyful potential of inquiry grown from slow noticing.


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 8
  • Room Room 8

2:30pm

Creating a Community of Thinkers: Visible Thinking as a Tool
In this course participants will experience how to build a culture of thinking in the whole community around a school—including students, teachers, leaders and parents—and how to sustain it when ”core” teachers leave. We will focus on the importance of inviting teachers as well as parents into the process of making thinking visible in the classroom. Participants will be introduced to a number of thinking routines that can be used in different settings, in all subjects, and in social situations with students, at faculty meetings and at parent meetings. Participants will also have the opportunity to collaboratively develop their thinking about how to start and/or deepen the work with Visible Thinking at their schools.

Presenters
LN

Lotta Norell

Educator, NUKAB
Lotta Norell has been a teacher for many, many years. Now she is educating teachers, mostly in Sweden, about Visible Thinking. Lotta was the coordinator for the project” Making Thinking Visible” at Lemshaga Academy, Sweden 2000-2005. That was the beginning of Visible Thinking. Lotta... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Dance Studio
  • Room Dance Studio

2:30pm

Cultivating a New Generation of Learners
This course focuses on today’s learner. Participants will be invited to contrast traditional notions of learning with one informed by closer attention to the eight cultural forces in the classroom identified by Ron Ritchhart in Making Thinking Visible. The course will highlight these cultural forces, while also exploring the elements of a tool called the Understanding Map, which gives direction for teachers and students on a learning journey. Stops along the map will provide an opportunity to deepen our understanding of how learners learn and become more open to taking risks.

Presenters
KS

Karen Sinclair

4th grade Teacher, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools
JY

Jodi Yeloushan

Principal, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Writing Lab
  • Room Writing Lab

2:30pm

Discourse in the Cultures of Thinking Classroom 
How do conversation, language and discussion in a “culture of thinking” classroom differ from the notion of a traditional classroom? How do we understand effective discourse patterns, versus ineffective ones, so that we as teachers can better foster powerful learning communities? This course, led by Project Zero researcher Ron Ritchhart, will focus on current research conducted by the Cultures of Thinking research team at Project Zero in the area of discourse. Drawing on current work in the field, this session will allow participants to examine practices that can help teachers at all grade levels and across subject areas create a culture of thinking and that encourage deep understanding in students. Participants will explore the way educators can use thinking routines designed to facilitate thinking while structuring the discourse of the classroom.

Presenters
avatar for Ron Ritchhart

Ron Ritchhart

Principal Investigator, HGSE Project Zero
Ron Ritchhart is a Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Harvard Project Zero where his work focuses on the development of school and classroom culture as prime vehicles for developing students’ as powerful thinkers and learners.  Ron’s most recent book, Creating... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room C
  • Room Room C

2:30pm

Disturbance: Engaging Students through Ideas of Wide Scope
In the spring of 2010, a college professor and a staff developer got together to design a presentation for a PZ conference. They met in a high school classroom where they engaged students through a variety of thinking routines around global issues presented in Peter Senge’s 2008 book, The Necessary Revolution. They wondered together, “How might we use the story of 20th Century revolutions to help make students’ thinking visible relative to their potentially lifelong responsibilities around globally pressing issues?” In the process, the college professor and staff developer experienced a disturbance in their own thinking, perceiving and believing. This course is a recounting of those experiences, wherein participants will, through thinking routines, individual and group reflections, and the discussion of next steps, encounter disturbances in their thinking toward a better understanding of how and where learning thrives.

Presenters
avatar for Janet Navarro

Janet Navarro

Professor, Grand Valley State University
Equity Open-mindedness Kindness Joy My Family Summer at the Lake
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 9
  • Room Room 9

2:30pm

Do-It-Together: An Exploration of Creativity and Collaboration in Maker-Centered Learning Environments
The contemporary maker movement has been described as a return to the DIY (do-it-yourself) movement of the 1960s and ‘70s. Now, as then, the proposed benefits of engaging children in DIY learning experiences range from heightened expertise in STEM subjects to increased creative capacities for young people. While few makers and educators would argue against the content-area and creativity-based learning outcomes associated with DIY activities, some, such as Make magazine columnist David Lang, have suggested that the “DIY” moniker is in itself a misnomer for maker-centered learning: Making isn’t about doing things oneself; instead, it is about collectively engaging in innovation networks together. During this hands-on course, Project Zero researcher Edward Clapp will engage participants in a series of fast-paced design challenges that emphasize the do-it-together nature of maker-centered learning experiences. The ultimate goal is to provide participants with first-hand experience in group-based creative problem-solving activities, while also offering strategies for incorporating these activities—and others like them—into an array of learning environments.

Presenters
avatar for Edward Clapp

Edward Clapp

Senior Research Manager, Project Zero
Edward P. Clapp is a senior research manager and a member of the core research team working on the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative—an investigation of the promises, practices, and pedagogies of maker-centered learning—at Project Zero, an educational research center at the Harvard... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Physics
  • Room Physics

2:30pm

From Puppets to Robots: STEAM (Science, Technology, Education, Arts, Mathematics), Maker Education and Design Thinking as Inclusive, Engaging, Self-Differentiating
Maker Education and Design Thinking have been gaining more traction and credibility in educational settings. In this course, the presenter will share the story of From Puppets to Robots, a curriculum that was implemented with elementary and middle school students. The unit fouses on exploring human movements and ways they can be incorporated into making puppets and simple robots. Later lessons build on student knowledge of human movement to explore and build robots to create a positive impact on humankind. After engaging in a short overview about making and design thinking, participants will use basic craft materials to construct robotic arms, and then progress into using technology to help with the design and making process, concluding with the construction of robotic prototypes–exploring and discussing along the way how these activities support and promote design thinking and making.

Presenters
avatar for Jackie Gerstein

Jackie Gerstein

Gifted Teacher and EdTech Adjunct Faculty, SFPS and Boise State University
My byline is, “I don’t do teaching for a living. I live teaching as my doing . . . and technology has amplified my passion for doing so.” I teach elementary gifted students. I teach graduate courses in Educational Technology for Boise State, Walden, and Western’s Governors... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Lower Bio/Chem
  • Room Lower Biology/Chemistry

2:30pm

Global Competence Begins in Preschool: The Urgency of Nurturing Empathy
How can we transform our early childhood classrooms so that they nurture global thinkers? How do recognizing the way the mind regulates emotions and the way emotions affect other people shape empathetic preschoolers? This course offers opportunities to analyze how thinking routines engage preschoolers in the nurturing of global habits of mind that enable them to listen with empathy and think flexibly as they attempt to see the world through the perspectives of others. Special emphasis will be given to how preschoolers become aware of their own emotions, as well as to how to manage their emotions and the emotions of others. We will also discuss how they learn about the relationship between the brain and the mind.

Presenters
avatar for Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Instructor, Florida International University
AM

Andrea Muñoz

Preschool Teacher, The Joy of Learning Educational Center


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 7
  • Room Room 7

2:30pm

Imagination, Expression, Reflection: Creating a Mixed Media Book
The Visual Arts Department teaching team at Lick-Wilmerding invites educators from all subjects to participate in this hands-on studio workshop. Focusing on three specific habits of mind—imagination, expression and reflection—participants will engage in a creative process of making a mixed media book in response to a short text. Participants will be asked to avoid “illustrating” and encouraged instead to explore and experiment with a variety of media, familiar and new, to discover how spontaneity, improvisation and even error can lead to deeper thinking and potentially original solutions. As they create participants will be asked to think like an artist and to reflect on the abiding question,“How do I enter unseen territory?” The course will introduce practical skills and methods, inspired by Project Zero philosophies and Artful Thinking routines, educators can take back to their classrooms and schools.

Presenters
LG

Lydia Greer

Visual Arts Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School
OO

oleg osipoff

Teacher in Visual Art, Lick Wilmerding High School
Teacher of Visual Art - Drawing, Painting, Mixed-Media, Printmaking, Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Videography. Member of Visual Arts Department that incorporates Habits of Mind into curriculum and teaching methods.
GP

Goranka Poljak-Hoy

Visual Arts Department Chair, Art and Architecture Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School
RS

Robert Sanborn

Visual Arts Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Art Studio
  • Room Art Studio

2:30pm

Job-Embedded Professional Learning: Looking at Student Thinking to Jump-Start Conversations
This interactive course will provide participants with an opportunity to engage in professional observations and conversations about student thinking, formative assessment and ways to build a culture of thinking within the elementary classroom. Participants will develop an understanding of how job-embedded professional learning experiences (professional development that takes place on the job, not away from school or on “special” days set aside for teachers) can launch discussions about problems of practice and viable solutions. This coaching model has proven to be quite effective in a large public school district in Michigan.

Presenters
avatar for Ellen Cale

Ellen Cale

Differentiation Resource Teacher, Troy School District
I am the Cultures of Thinking coordinator and teacher coach for twelve elementary schools in the Troy, MI School District. Talk to me about growing Cultures of Thinking.
avatar for Kaitlin O'Riordan

Kaitlin O'Riordan

Coach/Teaching and Learning Leader, Troy School District
Kaitlin has spent 14 years in the classroom as an educator, and recently took a step out of the classroom to develop a position that supports teachers. Teachers are often asked to implement new initiatives without much- or any-support. She feels fortunate to work with a group of teachers... Read More →
avatar for Shari Pawlus

Shari Pawlus

Coach/Teaching and Learning Leader, Troy School District
After serving as an elementary school teacher for eight years, Shari recently stepped out of the classroom to become an instructional coach. This position has given her the opportunity to work side by side with teachers as they work to improve their practice.


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room B
  • Room Room B

2:30pm

Make It Happen! The Magical Power of Uncovering Thinking and Learning
What impact do you expect your children to make on the world, and the world on them, 25 years from now? The 21st century requires changing the stories of teaching and learning. But where do we start, especially with very young children, ages 1 to 5? During this interactive course we will explore how to build engaging and passion-based learning environments where our students become immersed in a culture of thinking and develop dispositions that support the most powerful thinking and learning experiences across subject areas. We will examine how the Visible Thinking framework broadens and deepens understandings, and how it also can be an effective assessment tool for teachers and students. We will focus on the magical power of making learning and thinking visible and ways to make it happen.

Presenters
avatar for Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Founder/Principal, BaBidiBu Early Childhood Education


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room D
  • Room Room D

2:30pm

Making Thinking Routines Visible
As teachers of adolescents, we may assume that our students will recognize the design of our lesson plan and topics we want them to understand from the sequence of activities we plan for them. We assume that students will see the invisible seam that binds our teacher thinking. Thinking routines can make that invisible seam visible and give students the tools to innovate and explore, to become autonomous learners, and to engage in substantive conversations about ideas and concepts. In this course, we will examine how thinking routines can be modeled effectively and how students can use them. We will focus on three particular routines and examine a piece of literature through the practice of these routines, watch a student discussion based on a routine and hear students reflect on the ways they use routines. Although this workshop will use a piece of imaginative literature as a text, the session is equally applicable to any humanities, arts or social science class.

Presenters
JS

Jennifer Selvin

English Department Chair, Lick-Wilmerding High School


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Upper Biology
  • Room Upper Biology

2:30pm

Making Thinking Visible with Technology
"It's not about the technology. It's about learning." Workshop participants will learn to develop opportunities for students to make their thinking visible with technology (MTVT). With freely available Web 2.0 tools and social media students can engage in thinking routines to provide evidence of their thinking and demonstrate their understanding of course content in multiple ways (images, audio, video, presentations, artwork and more). Lessons and activities that integrate the thinking routines with technology often simultaneously incorporate 21st century skills. Thus, Making Thinking Visible with Technology (MTVT) provides opportunities to weave together many of the tenets and best practices featured in myriad educational innovations and reform measures. Such lessons and activities can promote higher-order thinking skills and deep reflection, increased student engagement, technology integration, creativity, digital citizenship, evidence of student performance and understanding, along with related curriculum and content standards. Given that teachers often voice concern about about the lack of time to incorporate all of these various standards, skills, topics and techniques into their classes, rather than trying to "cover" each of these in isolation, MTVT helps us to engage students in rich learning opportunities where these elements support and complement one another. In David Perkins’s words, it's an opportunity to make learning whole. Participants will learn about the MTVT framework, design lessons and collect practical tips.

Presenters
avatar for Clif Mims

Clif Mims

Professor, University of Memphis
Clif Mims is a teacher, researcher, author, speaker and educational consultant specializing in the effective integration of technology with teaching and learning. He is a native of the Mississippi Delta and has more than 25 years of teaching experience. He taught elementary and middle... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Computer Lab
  • Room Computer Lab

2:30pm

Math, Making and Designing Purpose
The course presenters will share their practice of encouraging creativity, persistence and craftsmanship through the languages of design and mathematics in interdisciplinary projects that engage students in complex issues about themselves and their world. In this course, participants will collaborate in teams to empathize with students’ needs and multiple intelligences. By weaving interdisciplinary connections between projects, content standards, interests and learning goals, they will design projects that empower students with the ability to use their experiences and multiple perspectives for finding and solving interconnected problems.

Presenters
CH

Corrina Hui

Math Teacher, East Bay School for Boys
Corrina is thrilled to be teaching 7th and 8th Grade Math at East Bay School for Boys. Corrina is a native of San Francisco and spent part of her childhood in Hong Kong. After graduating from Lick-Wilmerding High School in San Francisco, Corrina studied in France and China and earned... Read More →
KM

Kyle Metzner

Teacher, East Bay School for Boys
Kyle Metzner is a design and shop teacher at the East Bay School for Boys. Prior to EBSB, Kyle spent 17 years passionately working in the field of design and fabrication. He has designed and built within the areas of architectural design, furniture design, art fabrication, and aerospace... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Upper Chemistry
  • Room Upper Chemistry

2:30pm

Promoting Visible Thinking Through Digital Documentation of Learning
What are the challenges and benefits of documenting thinking through video? Which frameworks are useful for telling stories of learning? Participants in this course will engage in meaningful discussion about effective practices for the documentation process, inspired by the ongoing work in Reggio Emilia, Italy, preschools and at Project Zero. By critically examining existing examples, participants will explore the dispositions that lend themselves well to collaborative documentation and deepen their own understanding of what is working well in the classroom and what needs improvement. Participants will also develop action plans for documenting a visible thinking activity in their work setting and will be able to make informed decisions about intended audience.

Presenters
avatar for Richard Anderson

Richard Anderson

Director of Information Services, Washington International School
Richard Anderson is the Director of Information Services at Washington International School. He became a Certified Google Education Trainer in 2011 and is passionate about using Google Apps to improve workflows and encourage collaboration among all members of the school community... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 4
  • Room Room 4

2:30pm

Redesigning Civic Education for the Digital Age
Leveraging the affordances of digital media, youth are investigating issues they care about, engaging in dialogue with their peers and community, producing and circulating compelling messages, and mobilizing others around a common cause. Participants in this course will learn of the increasing significance of participatory politics and the ways in which youth use digital tools to engage in the core civic and political practices of investigation, dialogue and feedback, circulation, production, and mobilization. At the same time, they will consider the potential risks of digitally enabled civic action–such as assessing the credibility of information, maintaining civility, crafting effective messages, and considering the afterlife of circulated content. Participants will be provided with curricular ideas developed and piloted by teams in the Educating for Participatory Politics (EPP) project—an action project of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP). By participating in a sample lesson from a digitally enhanced Facing History and Ourselves unit for high school students, participants will experience first-hand how to engage youth in the participatory practice of circulation.

Presenters
avatar for Erica Hodgin

Erica Hodgin

Associate Director, Civic Engagement Research Group
Erica Hodgin is the Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Research Group (CERG) at Mills College and the Research Director of the Educating for Participatory Politics project -- an action group of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP... Read More →
MR

Margaret Rundle

Research Project Specialist, Project Zero
Margaret Rundle is a Research Project Specialist on the Good Participation Project, the Educating for Participatory Politics Project, and the Good Collaboration Project at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research interests include human development through... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 3
  • Room Room 3

2:30pm

Slowing Down, Sharing Stories: Creating Powerful Learning Moments for Today’s “Digital Youth”
In the frenzied pace of school life, students (and teachers) rarely have time to consider big questions about themselves and humanity as a whole: How do our lives relate to place? How are we connected to other human beings? How do we as individuals fit into a bigger story of human history? Moreover, we rarely find the time to observe closely what is going on around us or to listen attentively to other people’s stories. In this course we will draw from Project Zero’s collaboration with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, whose seven-year Out of Eden Walk involves retracing the migratory pathways of our ancient human ancestors and generating “slow journalism”. We will engage in a variety of activities that encourage students both to learn from the stories and perspectives of others as well as to reflect in new ways about themselves and the wider world. While we will introduce participants to Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero’s free, online learning community for elementary, middle and high school students, our activities will also be applicable to off-line classroom contexts. The course is open to all but may be of particular interest to language arts and social studies educators.

Presenters
avatar for Natalie Boes Belli

Natalie Boes Belli

Grade 5 language arts and social studies teacher, Village School
Grade 5 humanities teacher -- I am passionate about learning and improving student understanding. I make thinking visible and organic by layering and extending thinking routines in a nontraditional classroom setting. My classroom has been described as a networking, researching... Read More →
avatar for Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Principal Investigator, Project Zero
I've been playing a leading role with Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero's new online learning community to accompany journalist Paul Salopek's epic walk around the world. I'm a former history teacher and I'm particularly interested in making history and social studies more personally... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 6
  • Room Room 6

2:30pm

Studio Habits of Mind Applied to an Interdisciplinary Unit
Radiate: The Power of Power! is a rigorous, hands-on interdisciplinary project involving chemistry, visual art, American history and American literature. In it, students design and create books about nuclear energy. In this course participants will examine the way backward-design unit planning to generate a topic, write learning objectives aligned to the Common Core, and develop assessments centered around the eight Studio Habits of Mind have led to an engaging and authentic learning experience for students. We will also explore the creation of our own interdisciplinary topics.

Presenters
SE

Shannon Erby

Teacher, Arts and Humanities Academy of Berkeley High School
MG

Mat Glaser

Teacher, Arts and Humanities Academy of Berkeley High School


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Electronics
  • Room Electronics

2:30pm

Supporting Meaningful and Civil Youth Voices in a Global, Digital World
In this interactive course, Carrie James (Project Zero) and Chris Sloan (educator, National Writing Project & Youth Voices) will explore the affordances of our global, digital world for youth engagement in meaningful and civil dialogue. We begin with the important premise that opportunities for voice are central for youth development, empowerment and global awareness. We also recognize that online spaces are central venues for voice and dialogue today. In this session, we will share insights from research and practice that point to the positive opportunities and complex challenges of online dialogue for youth in particular. Participants will engage in various activities in which they consider what meaningful and respectful dialogue can look like online. Through these activities, the presenters will share a set of ideas and tools–including a pedagogy of listening, selected thinking routines and features of face-to-face dialogue–that can be leveraged to support positive dialogue online. The presenters will also introduce participants to two platforms – Youth Voices and Out of Eden Learn—which are designed to create the conditions for meaningful and civil online exchanges.

Presenters
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.
avatar for Chris Sloan

Chris Sloan

English & media teacher, Judge Memorial High School
Judge Memorial English teacher and media adviser. Helping to develop youthvoices.net since 2005. Teacher consultant with the National Writing Project and KQED Education. Google Certified Innovator. EPET PhD candidate at Michigan State University. Participates in Teachers Teaching... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Music Room
  • Room Music Room

2:30pm

The GoodProject: Ideas and Tools for a Good Life
How can we encourage individuals to carry out their work and life in new ways that are ethical and that advance the human condition? This course will introduce participants to a sampling of the research and practical materials of The Good Project, which for almost 20 years has worked to identify and learn from individuals and institutions that exemplify "good work"—work that is high quality, ethical and personally meaningful—and ways this work relates to collaboration, quality, trust and trustworthiness, digital ethics, participation in the civic and public spheres, and even family dinner at home. Participants will experience practical applications used with students and educators of all ages, in various educational contexts, all over the world. Explore how to help students to think about ethical dilemmas they face in their work and to collaborate with others in meaningful ways. Investigate ways to help educators think about how they structure their time, and how technology may or may not influence the use of "time well spent." This course will help participants think about ways to best prepare students to be caring people, ethical workers and engaged citizens today and in the future. Come prepared to talk, listen and engage in hands-on activities about these important topics.

Presenters
WF

Wendy Fischman

Project Manager, Project Zero


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
The Center
  • Room The Center

2:30pm

Tinkering with Words: The Art of Haiku
How do we help our students slow down, observe the world closely and develop descriptive language? How do we encourage a thinking-through-making approach to writing? Educators from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will present practical strategies for connecting poetry and art using a thinking routine to encourage careful observation and creative interpretation. The session will include an introduction to the art of haiku and its relationship to maker thinking. Looking at a work of art, instructors will model a routine that supports students’ observation and description skills. They will demonstrate how to creatively compose haiku, including collaborative editing and revising. Working both individually and collaboratively, participants will physically break down their poems into the essential building blocks–words. Through the thoughtful and playful act of tinkering, experimenting and manipulating, participants will generate stronger literary works of art. Slowing down and actively engaging with a work of art through careful observation, creative writing and collaboration provides an authentic learning experience where thoughtful writing represents complex thinking. With interdisciplinary applications, this model can be used in classroom, museum and professional development contexts.

Presenters
avatar for Nathalie Ryan

Nathalie Ryan

Senior Educator and Manager, Gallery and Studio Learning, National Gallery of Art
Nathalie Ryan is an educator at the National Gallery of Art, Washington (DC), where she has coordinated and taught in-gallery and studio programs for all ages since 2002. She received her Ed.M. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, M.A. in art history from The University... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room A
  • Room Room A

2:30pm

Using Art Skills to Build Understanding of Fractions and Geometry, and Math Skills to Inform Artistic Practice
Children as creative makers of art, meaning, understanding, reality and their own futures is the underlying theme of this course, which connects directly to the conference theme, Encouraging Creativity and “Maker Thinking” in Children. Participants will view and make origami books and sculptures that are intentionally art, while being connected to possibilities for greater understanding in math. Participants will also brainstorm how educators might modify the creation of these structures towards specific math learning goals. We will also look at how displaying, sharing and playing with these sculpture-structures can aid in the further development of students’ understanding of concepts that are simultaneously apparently simple and engagingly complex.

Presenters
DK

Debra Koppman

artist resident, Sequoia Elementary
I am a practicing artist as well as an art educator. I am involved with many community mural projects, both painted and mosaic tiled. I am interested in art which involves and engages communities.


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 5
  • Room Room 5

2:30pm

Visible Thinking in the Second Language Acquisition Process: A Natural Environment for Communication
In this course participants will experience how to build a culture of thinking in the foreign language classroom, practicing how to develop learning opportunities that encourage students to cultivate dispositions, not merely test-taking abilities. The instructors, both Spanish teachers, will offer examples of teaching and learning experiences using Visible Thinking routines in the foreign language classroom, including reflections from students about how these routines have helped them to contextualize their language use as well as lowered their affective filters towards their practice. The intention is to show how Visible Thinking routines can promote a positive attitude for foreign language learners who too often find themselves trapped in frustrating "right or wrong" mind frames.

Presenters
avatar for Carmen Samanes

Carmen Samanes

MYP Coordinator/Teacher, Atlanta International School
Carmen Samanes is a MYP curriculum coordinator and Spanish/Humanities Teachers at Atlanta International School with eighteen years of International education experience. She is interested in language acquisition research. In order to help students learn better and become more thoughtful... Read More →
avatar for Elena Zapico

Elena Zapico

Spanish Teacher, Atlanta International School
I am a Spanish teacher dedicated to create a Culture of Thinking that transforms the way Foreign Languages are learned and used in and beyond the classroom setting. Besides teaching, I am completing my PhD in Literature through the University of Salamanca, Spain. When I don´t... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Room 1
  • Room Room 1

4:45pm

Closing Plenary Session -- Project Zero Perspectives on Learning
Since 1967, Project Zero has examined the development of learning processes in children, adults and organizations. Through scores of research projects, it has investigated the nature of intelligence, understanding, thinking, creativity, ethics and other essential aspects of human learning. While the ideas and frameworks developed at Project Zero over the decades are diverse, they all share some common themes, which together coalesce into a distinct perspective on learning. This presentation aims to uncover what’s distinctive about a Project Zero perspective on learning. Drawing on examples from from current and former projects, Shari Tishman, former director, and Daniel Wilson, current director, will explore how Project Zero’s new work builds on ideas from several past and current projects, especially those represented at this conference.

Presenters
avatar for Daniel Wilson

Daniel Wilson

Director, Project Zero
Dr. Daniel Wilson is the Director of Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE). He is a Principal Investigator at Project Zero, a Lecturer at HGSE, Faculty for the Doctorate for Educational Leadership program at HGSE, and the Educational Chair at Harvard’s... Read More →


Friday October 10, 2014 4:45pm - 5:15pm
Theater
  • Room Theater
 
Saturday, October 11
 

9:00am

Panel Discussion -- The Promises and Possibilities of Maker-Centered Learning, moderated by Shari Tishman
Since the first Maker Faire was held in San Mateo, CA, in 2006, the “maker movement”—the social embodiment of the contemporary DIY cultural resurgence—has sparked tremendous interest in maker-centered learning, and brought with it a renewed interest in design thinking and the technical arts. This panel brings together educators from different corners of the maker-educator world to share ideas and examples related to  three questions: 1) What are the benefits of maker-centered learning for today's young people?  2) What can it look like in practice?  3) Why should we care—as educators and as citizens?

Moderators
avatar for Shari Tishman

Shari Tishman

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
Shari Tishman is a Lecturer at Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Senior Research Associate at Harvard Project Zero, where she recently served as Director. Her research focuses on the development of thinking and understanding, the role of close observation in learning, and... Read More →

Presenters
SD

Steve Davee

Director , d.school at Stanford
YF

Youssou Fall

Technical Art Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School
SW

Susie Wise

Director of Education and Communications , Maker Education Initiative


Saturday October 11, 2014 9:00am - 10:15am
Theater
  • Room Theater

10:15am

AM BREAK
Saturday October 11, 2014 10:15am - 10:45am
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

10:45am

Studio Habits of Mind
Since its inception in 2003, the Studio Thinking Framework has been used nationally and internationally in a wide variety of ways. This session explores those different approaches: what it can be used for, the value added of including it in your practice, and new ways people may be developing for its use even as we speak!


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 11:30am
Drafting and Design
  • Room Drafting and Design

10:45am

Artful Thinking and Making in the Classroom
The specific goal of the Artful Thinking program is to help teachers regularly use works of visual art and music in their curriculum in ways that strengthen student thinking and deepen disciplinary learning. Like all Visible Thinking initiatives at Project Zero, the Artful Thinking program emphasizes thinking dispositions, thinking routines and documentation of student thinking. This course introduces participants to the Artful Thinking program and instructional resources. Through activities and demonstrations, participants will think broadly about how viewing and making art can connect to a variety of curricular topics. Participants will also explore how the complex thinking that occurs naturally in the arts can inform students’ and teachers’ understanding of thinking in general. Using examples of visual art, objects, poetry and primary source documents, audience members will participate in thinking routines, art making and discussion of the potential curriculum connections for Artful Thinking in their own practice.

Presenters
avatar for Jessica Ross

Jessica Ross

Researcher/Practioner, Project Zero
Jessica Ross is a senior practitioner specialist working at Project Zero on the Agency by Design Project.  Jessica was a founding team member of the Global Learning Charter Public School, where she taught grade 5-8 humanities for ten years.  A licensed principal, she has also served... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 11
  • Room Room 11

10:45am

Articulation and Reflection: Keys to Encouraging Deep Thinking in Our Youngest Students
Have you ever considered how you approach the creation and cultivation of your classroom culture? As members of a learning community, we should be considering what types of activities, projects and assignments will really make a difference in the educational experiences of our students. How can students feel safe enough to share their ideas, connections, predictions and opinions? How can elementary students reflect in a manner that is profound and deep? In this course, participants will explore how teachers and students can go from being partners to being owners of their learning—in age-appropriate ways.How do students approach learning? Are they engaged? Are they self-motivated? Will they be able to continue even if and when the teacher is not there? Using Project Zero ideas and routines, this course will explore how teachers can use articulation and reflection to help create classrooms that value and encourage deep thinking in our youngest students.

Presenters
avatar for Denise Coffin

Denise Coffin

Kindergarten Teacher, Sidwell Friends School
Denise Coffin teaches Kindergarten at Sidwell Friends School. She has been using Thinking Routines and other Project Zero ideas in her classroom for the past five years. She has been a presenter/exhibitor at several Looking at Student/Teacher Thinking exhibitions in Washington and... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 2
  • Room Room 2

10:45am

Discourse in the Cultures of Thinking Classroom 
How do conversation, language and discussion in a “culture of thinking” classroom differ from the notion of a traditional classroom? How do we understand effective discourse patterns, versus ineffective ones, so that we as teachers can better foster powerful learning communities? This course, led by Project Zero researcher Ron Ritchhart, will focus on current research conducted by the Cultures of Thinking research team at Project Zero in the area of discourse. Drawing on current work in the field, this session will allow participants to examine practices that can help teachers at all grade levels and across subject areas create a culture of thinking and that encourage deep understanding in students. Participants will explore the way educators can use thinking routines designed to facilitate thinking while structuring the discourse of the classroom.

Presenters
avatar for Ron Ritchhart

Ron Ritchhart

Principal Investigator, HGSE Project Zero
Ron Ritchhart is a Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Harvard Project Zero where his work focuses on the development of school and classroom culture as prime vehicles for developing students’ as powerful thinkers and learners.  Ron’s most recent book, Creating... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room C
  • Room Room C

10:45am

Helping Youth Navigate in the Digital Age: A Whole-Community Approach to Digital Citizenship
Students grow up in a digital world with potential for enhanced communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creation. Yet schools face challenges with ethical issues that arise from students’ use of technology, such as cyberbullying, inappropriate sharing and plagiarism. Digital citizenship includes a range of essential 21st century skills, i.e., students learn to think critically, behave safely and participate responsibly in our digital world. In this course, learn how to take a whole-community approach to digital citizenship at your school, building a positive culture around technology. Learn the myths and the realities of how tweens and teens are participating with digital media, based on research on digital ethics from Project Zero’s Good Play Project. Next, learn the components of the “three-legged stool” for a whole-community approach to digital citizenship, including an overview of Common Sense Media’s free K-12 Digital Literacy & Citizenship Curriculum. Participants will explore lesson plans, see how to weave digital citizenship into different subject areas, and understand how to use the design thinking process to give students a voice and a sense of agency, all the while supporting Common Core and ISTE standards. Participants will also see applications of digital citizenship with examples from a middle school Digital Citizenship Certified Educator from the Bay Area, including school-wide projects on digital citizenship and ethics, and classroom-based examples of how to use design thinking to explore the civic, moral, and ethical opportunities and challenges afforded by the digital age. Lastly, participants will work collaboratively and independently to develop their own plan addressing digital citizenship at their school.

Presenters
avatar for Jessica Lura

Jessica Lura

Curriculum Coodinator, Bullis Charter School
I have been an educator for 17 years and have taught 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 8th grades. I am passionate about technology, learning by doing, children's books, and the environment. I currently work at a Bullis Charter School in the SF Bay Area.
avatar for Kelly Mendoza

Kelly Mendoza

Sr. Director, Education Programs, Common Sense Education
Kelly Mendoza oversees digital citizenship education content and strategy for Common Sense Education, including the Digital Citizenship Curriculum, interactive games, and online professional development. Her goal is to create curricula and programs that help students think critically... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Lower Bio/Chem
  • Room Lower Biology/Chemistry

10:45am

How Leaders Can Shape a Culture of Thinking
This course will explore how a collaborative team of leaders can shape a culture of thinking by influencing teachers' instructional practice. Relying on the most current research and findings associated with Project Zero, school leaders in a Michigan public school district have explored, guided and influenced teachers' instruction with carefully planned strategies that are clear and responsive in order to help them increase the frequency of using thinking routines in their classrooms. Results from this evaluation will be used to make recommendations to school leadership as they seek to create a school that embraces a cultures of thinking philosophy and/or design additional methods for schools already embarked on this journey. Participants will examine case studies of classroom instruction and will learn by doing in this session.

Presenters
TB

Todd Bidlack

Principal, Rochester Community Schools/Delta Kelly Elementary
avatar for Jennifer Johnson

Jennifer Johnson

Assistant Principal, Clarkston Community Schools/Sashabaw Middle School
avatar for Julie Rains

Julie Rains

Information Literacy Specialist & AbD Online Course Instructor
Passionate about fostering positive interactions and relationships, I am committed to collaborating with students and teachers from around the world. It is a true joy to experiment, investigate, and grapple with ideas to encourage reflection from a variety of viewpoints. In addition... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 7
  • Room Room 7

10:45am

Job-Embedded Professional Learning: Looking at Student Thinking to Jump-Start Conversations
This interactive course will provide participants with an opportunity to engage in professional observations and conversations about student thinking, formative assessment and ways to build a culture of thinking within the elementary classroom. Participants will develop an understanding of how job-embedded professional learning experiences (professional development that takes place on the job, not away from school or on “special” days set aside for teachers) can launch discussions about problems of practice and viable solutions. This coaching model has proven to be quite effective in a large public school district in Michigan.

Presenters
avatar for Ellen Cale

Ellen Cale

Differentiation Resource Teacher, Troy School District
I am the Cultures of Thinking coordinator and teacher coach for twelve elementary schools in the Troy, MI School District. Talk to me about growing Cultures of Thinking.
avatar for Kaitlin O'Riordan

Kaitlin O'Riordan

Coach/Teaching and Learning Leader, Troy School District
Kaitlin has spent 14 years in the classroom as an educator, and recently took a step out of the classroom to develop a position that supports teachers. Teachers are often asked to implement new initiatives without much- or any-support. She feels fortunate to work with a group of teachers... Read More →
avatar for Shari Pawlus

Shari Pawlus

Coach/Teaching and Learning Leader, Troy School District
After serving as an elementary school teacher for eight years, Shari recently stepped out of the classroom to become an instructional coach. This position has given her the opportunity to work side by side with teachers as they work to improve their practice.


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room B
  • Room Room B

10:45am

Math, Making and Designing Purpose
The course presenters will share their practice of encouraging creativity, persistence and craftsmanship through the languages of design and mathematics in interdisciplinary projects that engage students in complex issues about themselves and their world. In this course, participants will collaborate in teams to empathize with students’ needs and multiple intelligences. By weaving interdisciplinary connections between projects, content standards, interests and learning goals, they will design projects that empower students with the ability to use their experiences and multiple perspectives for finding and solving interconnected problems.

Presenters
CH

Corrina Hui

Math Teacher, East Bay School for Boys
Corrina is thrilled to be teaching 7th and 8th Grade Math at East Bay School for Boys. Corrina is a native of San Francisco and spent part of her childhood in Hong Kong. After graduating from Lick-Wilmerding High School in San Francisco, Corrina studied in France and China and earned... Read More →
KM

Kyle Metzner

Teacher, East Bay School for Boys
Kyle Metzner is a design and shop teacher at the East Bay School for Boys. Prior to EBSB, Kyle spent 17 years passionately working in the field of design and fabrication. He has designed and built within the areas of architectural design, furniture design, art fabrication, and aerospace... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Upper Chemistry
  • Room Upper Chemistry

10:45am

Slowing Down, Sharing Stories: Creating Powerful Learning Moments for Today’s “Digital Youth”
In the frenzied pace of school life, students (and teachers) rarely have time to consider big questions about themselves and humanity as a whole: How do our lives relate to place? How are we connected to other human beings? How do we as individuals fit into a bigger story of human history? Moreover, we rarely find the time to observe closely what is going on around us or to listen attentively to other people’s stories. In this course we will draw from Project Zero’s collaboration with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, whose seven-year Out of Eden Walk involves retracing the migratory pathways of our ancient human ancestors and generating “slow journalism”. We will engage in a variety of activities that encourage students both to learn from the stories and perspectives of others as well as to reflect in new ways about themselves and the wider world. While we will introduce participants to Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero’s free, online learning community for elementary, middle and high school students, our activities will also be applicable to off-line classroom contexts. The course is open to all but may be of particular interest to language arts and social studies educators.

Presenters
avatar for Natalie Boes Belli

Natalie Boes Belli

Grade 5 language arts and social studies teacher, Village School
Grade 5 humanities teacher -- I am passionate about learning and improving student understanding. I make thinking visible and organic by layering and extending thinking routines in a nontraditional classroom setting. My classroom has been described as a networking, researching... Read More →
avatar for Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Principal Investigator, Project Zero
I've been playing a leading role with Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero's new online learning community to accompany journalist Paul Salopek's epic walk around the world. I'm a former history teacher and I'm particularly interested in making history and social studies more personally... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 6
  • Room Room 6

10:45am

Supporting Meaningful and Civil Youth Voices in a Global, Digital World
In this interactive course, Carrie James (Project Zero) and Chris Sloan (educator, National Writing Project & Youth Voices) will explore the affordances of our global, digital world for youth engagement in meaningful and civil dialogue. We begin with the important premise that opportunities for voice are central for youth development, empowerment and global awareness. We also recognize that online spaces are central venues for voice and dialogue today. In this session, we will share insights from research and practice that point to the positive opportunities and complex challenges of online dialogue for youth in particular. Participants will engage in various activities in which they consider what meaningful and respectful dialogue can look like online. Through these activities, the presenters will share a set of ideas and tools–including a pedagogy of listening, selected thinking routines and features of face-to-face dialogue–that can be leveraged to support positive dialogue online. The presenters will also introduce participants to two platforms – Youth Voices and Out of Eden Learn—which are designed to create the conditions for meaningful and civil online exchanges.

Presenters
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.
avatar for Chris Sloan

Chris Sloan

English & media teacher, Judge Memorial High School
Judge Memorial English teacher and media adviser. Helping to develop youthvoices.net since 2005. Teacher consultant with the National Writing Project and KQED Education. Google Certified Innovator. EPET PhD candidate at Michigan State University. Participates in Teachers Teaching... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Music Room
  • Room Room A

10:45am

Using Stories to Incite Passion, Emotions, Relationships and Inspiration in Student Learning
This interactive session will engage participants directly in the processes of inciting deep learning through passion, emotions, relationships and inspiration. Using a variety of thinking routines, connected through video, audio and written stories, participants will experience deep learning and meaning making. Throughout the session, the presenters, instructional leaders in a public school district in Michigan, will identify the cultural forces that exist in every classroom, helping participants understand the need to attend to these in deliberate ways. Participants can use the format of, information from, and structure of the session to recreate a learning environment that incites deep learning.

Presenters
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
SR

Shawn Ryan

Deputy Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 12:45pm
Room 9
  • Room Room 9

10:45am

Documenting Student and Teacher Learning
The documentation practices developed in the world-renowned preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, have profoundly influenced practices at Project Zero as a result of a two decade-long collaboration with Reggio educators. Come hear about the ways PZ researchers have translated these practices into a variety of early childhood through secondary school settings in the U.S.

Presenters
avatar for Melissa Rivard

Melissa Rivard

Senior Project Manager, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Melissa Rivard is Senior Project Manager on the Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) initiative, supporting the Center’s strategy for creating and testing new innovations. She is the project lead for the Washington and Georgia state innovation clusters, in addition to supporting the addition of new projects to the Center’s FOI portfolio. Melissa joined the Center in December 2015. Prior to coming to the Center, she worked at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education as a Project Manager and Pedagogical Documen... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 11:30pm
Library
  • Room Library

10:45am

Getting More Out of Text: Thinking Routines and Reading Comprehension
This discussion is for anyone who might be wondering how thinking routines can be used to move elementary school children toward deeper understandings of written text. We will begin with a non-fiction text and explore an example of narrative fiction as time permits. Common Core Standards will serve as a footnote to our discussion.

Presenters
avatar for Janet Navarro

Janet Navarro

Professor, Grand Valley State University
Equity Open-mindedness Kindness Joy My Family Summer at the Lake


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 11:30pm
Room 10
  • Room Room 10

10:45am

Out of Eden Learn in the Elementary School Setting
Join a discussion about the experiences Out of Eden Learn offers for younger learners. Explore Out of Eden Learn activities that encourage “slowing down” learning, listening carefully, observing and reflecting to give students opportunities to learn more about themselves, and others. Together we’ll share ideas on how to integrate Out of Eden Learn into elementary subjects and the arts.

Presenters
avatar for Tabbatha O'Donnell

Tabbatha O'Donnell

Upper Elementary Division Lead, Meyer Academy
Tabbatha O’Donnell is an elementary teacher with over 20 years of experience in grades K-5. She began her teaching career in Hawaii where she immersed in Hawaii’s multicultural environment, leading to a unique approach and sensitivity to teaching with a global perspective. Currently... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 11:30pm
Room 8
  • Room Room 8

10:45am

The Work of Flux
Over the course of the conference, the Flux Foundation http://fluxfoundation.org/ will be engaging conference participants in collaboratively creating a large-scale work of public art.  Join them in this session to learn more about the work of Flux, and explore how engaging people in designing and building large-scale public art can be a catalyst for education, collaboration and empowerment.

Presenters
JH

Jess Hobbs

Flux Foundation
If you want to build a ship, don't drum up people together to collect wood and don't assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea - Antoine de Saint-Exupery
avatar for Catie Magee

Catie Magee

Co-Director, Artist & Instigator, Flux Foundation
To say Catie is a woman of many talents barely scratches the surface. Originally from Tucson, AZ, her Bay Area life is dedicated to building community and finding innovative ways to infuse creativity into her work as a public health professional. Catie brings her passion for coalescing... Read More →
avatar for pk.

pk.

Director + Artist, FLUX Foundation
Peter Kimelman (PK) is Co-Founder, Director and Artist of the FLUX Foundation, creators of large-scale interactive artworks. As an artist and architect his work spans the arbitrary boundaries of sculpture, building, interior, graphic, and installation design. Passionate about cultural... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 11:30pm
Art Studio
  • Room Art Studio

10:45am

Thinking Routines Work in All Contexts
Where do under-resourced and understaffed schools begin with implementing Project Zero ideas to affect school-wide change? In programs where resources are limited and challenges are ever-present, teachers using PZ thinking routines and attempting to build cultures of thinking can achieve amazing things with their students. Attendees will have the opportunity to brainstorm and share ideas for their own schools, as well as to explore the impact Project Zero has had in one such program in inner-city Washington, DC.

Presenters
avatar for Jodi Bossio

Jodi Bossio

English as a Second Language Coordinator / Language and Literature Teacher, DC International School
Jodi Bossio has been working as an educator for over 12 years in urban settings and has taught students in first grade through postgraduate education. She has a Master’s degree in education and is highly qualified in both English as a Second Language and English Teaching, with a... Read More →
avatar for Kristen Kullberg

Kristen Kullberg

Ars Integration Instructional Coach, Sacred Heart Bilingual School
Kristen Kullberg is the middle school Language Arts teacher and Arts Integration Instructional Coach at Sacred Heart School in Washington, DC.  Her dual role has allowed her to learn alongside students in PreK3 through 8th grade as they develop close looking, critical thinking, and... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 11:30pm
Electronics
  • Room Electronics

10:45am

When Change Has Legs
Come hear about and contribute to a discussion of a four-part framework for initiating and sustaining school change, based on the experiences of leaders in education from a number of different contexts around the world.

Presenters
avatar for David N. Perkins

David N. Perkins

Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
David Perkins is the Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr., Research Professor of Teaching and Learning at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, recently retired from the Senior Faculty. He has conducted long-term programs of research and development in the areas of teaching and learning for... Read More →
avatar for Jim Reese

Jim Reese

Director, Professional Development Collaborative, Washington International School
I am the founding Director of the Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School. Prior to taking on this role, I was Director of Studies for grades 6-12 at WIS and occasionally taught an English course. I have been working as a consultant with Project Zero... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 10:45am - 11:30pm
Wood Shop
  • Room Woodshop

11:30am

Strand A Lunch
Saturday October 11, 2014 11:30am - Sunday October 12, 2014 12:15am
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

12:15pm

A Beautiful Mess: Where Thinking Routines and Cultures of Thinking Collide
How can we use evidence of student learning to strengthen our classroom's culture of thinking? Participants will be invited to examine what happens when the themes of Building a Culture of Thinking and Making Thinking and Learning Visible collide. Participants will use thinking routines to explore student thinking while also reflecting on their own classroom cultures and thinkers. We will examine multiple examples of authentic student learning to gain insight into how it contributes to our class culture. We will also learn how educators can allow for students to help shape class culture by identifying pivotal points in their thinking, providing opportunities for further student-driven investigation, and inviting personal reflection on learning.

Presenters
avatar for Jodi Bossio

Jodi Bossio

English as a Second Language Coordinator / Language and Literature Teacher, DC International School
Jodi Bossio has been working as an educator for over 12 years in urban settings and has taught students in first grade through postgraduate education. She has a Master’s degree in education and is highly qualified in both English as a Second Language and English Teaching, with a... Read More →
avatar for Kristen Kullberg

Kristen Kullberg

Ars Integration Instructional Coach, Sacred Heart Bilingual School
Kristen Kullberg is the middle school Language Arts teacher and Arts Integration Instructional Coach at Sacred Heart School in Washington, DC.  Her dual role has allowed her to learn alongside students in PreK3 through 8th grade as they develop close looking, critical thinking, and... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Electronics
  • Room Electronics

12:15pm

Creating a Collaborative Learning Environment through Design
How should I arrange the furniture in this room? How can we reduce polluted water run off on this street? How can we develop a toilet that is usable in developing countries? Design is an inherently visible thinking process that encourages varied, divergent and creative solutions to problems of all scales. The National Building Museum’s Teen Programs engage local students in the issues and problems that impact their city and their lives, and shows them a pathway to being actively engaged in solving problems. In this session, participants will experience how these programs use collaborative, hands-on, real-world design challenges by exploring and identifying local design challenges in or near the Lick-Wilmerding High School. Based on their observations and research, teams of participants will work collaboratively to propose solutions to those challenges and produce concept boards and models that demonstrate their design process. They will present their ideas to the group and receive feedback as a means of improving their solutions and making connections to the wider community. Throughout the session, they will be practicing the habits of mind and methodologies that design inculcates: integrating information with personal opinion, linking solutions to lived experience, and emphasizing the iterative nature of creative problem-solving.

Presenters
AC

Andrew Costanzo

Teen Programs Manager, National Building Museum


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room D
  • Room Room D

12:15pm

Creating History through Making
Through building and crafting a multi-phase project, participants in this course will learn how to create a bound colonial style journal. The journals will be used as historical replicas to record written narratives of African American slaves in the United States. Participants will be immersed in the principles of project-based curriculum and a hands-on approach to learning. Presenters will highlight key elements of the maker movement that connect to this learning experience. This project represents an interdisciplinary approach involving subjects, but not limited to, language arts, social studies, and work (shop) and promotes “Do it Yourself” habits.

Presenters
avatar for Ben Bingham

Ben Bingham

U.S. History Teacher and Director of Technology, East Bay School for Boys
U.S. History Teacher, Director of Technology, Director of Athletics Berkeley, CA
KC

Kamia Cuevas

World Cultures Teacher, East Bay School for Boys


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Writing Lab
  • Room Writing Lab

12:15pm

Developing a Sensitivity to Design: Thinking Critically about the Made Dimensions of our World
Educational initiatives that emphasize making, design and tinkering are becoming increasingly popular in K-12 education. Through afterschool programs, technology classes and integrated maker classes, new pedagogies are aimed at encouraging young people to “learn to make” and “make to learn.” In this course, researchers from Project Zero and collaborating practitioners will present the teaching and learning opportunities offered by maker-centered experiences. Participants will engage in a series of hands-on activities with the goals of cultivating observation skills and encouraging critical analysis of the made dimensions of our world. Presenters will draw on Project Zero’s Agency by Design project, which is conducting research through interviews, site visits and action research with partnering prek-12 schools in Oakland, CA.

Presenters
JR

Jen Ryan

Researcher, Project Manager, Project Zero


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Tech Arts Studio 1
  • Room Tech Arts Studio 1

12:15pm

Dream-It-Yourself
This course will explore the nexus of design, “making” and interdisciplinary learning by challenging participants to see through multiple disciplinary lenses and devise creative solutions to complex global challenges. This exploration will be based on approaches used in a worldwide, interdisciplinary idea development program called the ArtScience Prize. Participants will work in groups to solve a world issue by prototyping creative solutions using various materials (some of which may be unexpected!) in a series of short design challenges. Closing reflection activities will connect these activities back to Project Zero research and participants’ own experiences in educational environments. The course builds on conference themes of design thinking, “making” and the ways that these activities pave the way for new possibilities in thinking, understanding and empowerment. It will reframe the DIY mindset from Do-It-Yourself to Dream-It-Yourself, exploring the ways that making and prototyping can provide opportunities for learners to build agency by looking at world issues around them in new and unexpected ways.

Presenters
avatar for Andrea Sachdeva

Andrea Sachdeva

International Director of Education, ArtScience Prize
Andrea Sachdeva oversees all ArtScience Prize program sites, from Cambridge’s Home Office to cities in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Africa. Andrea is a founding co-chair of the Continuing the Conversation series of regional and national arts education events hosted by the... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 1
  • Room Room 1

12:15pm

Exploring the Native American Story through Visible Representations of Thinking and Learning
Participants in this course will explore how students can engage in deep thinking as a community of learners to uncover and unpack complex events and perspectives though the lens of Native American history. This topic serves as a vehicle for deepening thinking, exploring various perspectives, and uncovering complex events and relationships. This topic is also filled with rich history that continues into the present day. Using artifacts and images, in combination with Project Zero thinking routines, we will see how student thinking can be deepened and transformed to guide the unit to a very meaningful place.

Presenters
BC

Britney Coleman

Grade 5 Teacher, Havergal College
Britney Coleman holds a Bachelor of Arts from Bishop’s University with a major in Educational Studies and a minor in Child Psychology; She also has a Master of Teaching from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Britney holds additional qualifications... Read More →
ND

Nicole Davies

Inquiry and Literacy Coordinator, Havergal College


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 5
  • Room Room 5

12:15pm

Exploring the Role of Science in Interdisciplinary Learning
Teachers face many challenges when they endeavor to collaborate on projects that are truly interdisciplinary. This course will introduce some examples of: 1) how to integrate multiple disciplinary lenses into middle and high school science units, and 2) how to explore concepts while making connections through authentic learning opportunities among subject groups. We will also see how thinking routines, science and interdisciplinary approaches go hand-in-hand, as routines help to deepen understanding of the topic being explored and serve to challenge misconceptions. The intended results are that students begin to make local and global connections and create a community of global thinkers. Participants will see examples of student thinking in action and try out thinking routines as they are used in science classes.

Presenters
avatar for Emily Smith

Emily Smith

US Science Teacher, Washington International School
Emily Smith is an upper school Biology and TOK teacher at Washington International School. She is also a senior examiner for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. A DC-area native, Emily has been teaching in both public and International schools in various locations around... Read More →
KW

Kusum Wagle

MS Science Teacher, Washington International School
Kusum Waglé is the middle school science coordinator at Washington International School. She has attended Project Zero institutes and presented PZ ideas in practice at various conferences. She has taught sciences for the last 21 years and this year incorporated PZ researcher Tina... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Upper Biology
  • Room Upper Biology

12:15pm

Make It Happen! The Magical Power of Uncovering Thinking and Learning
What impact do you expect your children to make on the world, and the world on them, 25 years from now? The 21st century requires changing the stories of teaching and learning. But where do we start, especially with very young children, ages 1 to 5? During this interactive course we will explore how to build engaging and passion-based learning environments where our students become immersed in a culture of thinking and develop dispositions that support the most powerful thinking and learning experiences across subject areas. We will examine how the Visible Thinking framework broadens and deepens understandings, and how it also can be an effective assessment tool for teachers and students. We will focus on the magical power of making learning and thinking visible and ways to make it happen.

Presenters
avatar for Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Founder/Principal, BaBidiBu Early Childhood Education


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Computer Lab
  • Room Computer Lab

12:15pm

Participatory Design of Open Portfolio Practices for Young Makers through Hands-On Making
Gluing, stitching, printing, welding. Young makers are full of ideas ready to explore–hands-on. Through their playful and collaborative tinkering with materials in their communities, young makers are developing skills and abilities that can be valuable for their personal development. Documenting their projects can provide young makers with the opportunity to reflect on their personal design processes and to make areas for further improvement and development visible. Today, maker portfolios are turning into valuable products for higher education admissions. Such portfolios make it possible for multiple audiences to see the kinds of problem framing and design decisions that young makers are engaged in. However, every maker space is different, and the diversity of young makers and their projects ask for context-specific use of documentation tools and practices. This course is a participatory design workshop. Through hands-on making we will explore creating youth-driven maker portfolios, and developing portfolio practices in the context of participants’ particular setting. Using conductive tape, we will create an interactive book with an integrated circuit, and document the process of making. We will share our projects and documentation practices, and consider how documentation could be shaped to enable young makers to create their own open maker portfolios.

Presenters
avatar for Anna Keune

Anna Keune

Graduate Research Assistant, Indiana University
I am a doctoral candidate in Learning Sciences at Indiana University working with Dr. Kylie Peppler in the Creativity Labs. As a new media artist and designer, she leverages her international experiences across four continents to engage in research that spans across art, technology... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 8
  • Room Room 8

12:15pm

Redesigning Civic Education for the Digital Age
Leveraging the affordances of digital media, youth are investigating issues they care about, engaging in dialogue with their peers and community, producing and circulating compelling messages, and mobilizing others around a common cause. Participants in this course will learn of the increasing significance of participatory politics and the ways in which youth use digital tools to engage in the core civic and political practices of investigation, dialogue and feedback, circulation, production, and mobilization. At the same time, they will consider the potential risks of digitally enabled civic action–such as assessing the credibility of information, maintaining civility, crafting effective messages, and considering the afterlife of circulated content. Participants will be provided with curricular ideas developed and piloted by teams in the Educating for Participatory Politics (EPP) project—an action project of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP). By participating in a sample lesson from a digitally enhanced Facing History and Ourselves unit for high school students, participants will experience first-hand how to engage youth in the participatory practice of circulation.

Presenters
avatar for Erica Hodgin

Erica Hodgin

Associate Director, Civic Engagement Research Group
Erica Hodgin is the Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Research Group (CERG) at Mills College and the Research Director of the Educating for Participatory Politics project -- an action group of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP... Read More →
MR

Margaret Rundle

Research Project Specialist, Project Zero
Margaret Rundle is a Research Project Specialist on the Good Participation Project, the Educating for Participatory Politics Project, and the Good Collaboration Project at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research interests include human development through... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 3
  • Room Room 3

12:15pm

Teacher Dispositions: How Maker Empowerment Starts with the Teacher
What do your teaching dispositions have to do with how your students understand the topics you teach? What is your own understanding of what you teach? How can maker and design thinking routines get you and your students to the heart of understanding? How do you know when your students are learning/understanding? In this course we’ll look at a typical lesson and adapt it. We’ll see how two maker routines can foster and promote deep understanding. In addition to creating engaging lessons, maker teachers also consider what tools, routines and materials inspire maker empowerment within their students. They find innovative ways to highlight the understanding as it’s taking place using PZ thinking routines and a plethora of documentation techniques. This course will inspire participants to approach Monday’s lessons differently.

Presenters
JE

Jenny Ernst

Park Day School, Park Day School
Teaching math and science with 6th graders at a progressive school has been a dream career. At this independent school in Oakland, my values around social justice have been cultivated through professional development to deeply understand my students and the world we live in. My latest... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 4
  • Room Room 4

12:15pm

Using Thinking Routines to Enhance Engagement and Deepen Learning
In this digital age, when experiences are often mediated by technology and when a barrage of images, text and sounds permeates our daily lives, it can feel profoundly rewarding to slow down and engage deeply in observation and conversation around a work of art. In this course, we will practice using Project Zero thinking routines to explore a few works of art to see how they can focus attention and encourage deep thinking. Thinking routines (a key component of Artful Thinking, Visible Thinking, Cultures of Thinking, and other Project Zero initiatives) are flexible, easy-to-learn strategies that support and promote rich thinking across various grade levels and content areas. We will use thinking routines to encourage the dispositions to observe, describe and wonder, and to uncover complex layers of meaning, through individual reflection and group discussion. This course will conclude with time to reflect on our own development of thinking and to brainstorm how these ideas can inspire classroom practice.

Presenters
avatar for Heidi Hinish

Heidi Hinish

Head, Gallery and Studio Learning, National Gallery of Art
Heidi Hinish is the head of the department of teacher, school, and family programs, in the division of education, at the National Gallery of Art, where she has worked since 1992.  As a museum educator, Heidi develops, teaches, and assesses programs and resources for children and... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Music Room
  • Room Music Room

12:15pm

When Our Learners are Teachers: Using a Learning Lab Approach to Create a Culture That Supports Professional Learning for Teachers
This course is designed to demonstrate how Teacher Learning Labs can be cultures of thinking that provide a powerful forum for professional learning. Participants in this session will explore the power of protocols and thinking routines for teachers who are participants in a non-judgmental learning experience that includes a ‘real time’ observation in a classroom. Throughout the course, thinking routines will be used to explore concepts such as the protocols for classroom observation; exploration of non-judgmental teacher language; and the impact of interactions and relationships both within the classroom and the teacher learning lab. Participants will discuss a professional reading related to job-embedded professional learning and view video footage of a classroom lab experience as well as the facilitated dialogue of teachers in a ‘learning lab’ setting.

Presenters
PN

Phyllis Ness

Elementary Literacy Specialist and Reading/Writing Subject Area Coordinator, Clarkston Community School
Phyllis is passionate about literacy. Throughout the past few years she has had the wonderful fortune of sharing her knowledge of effective reading and writing instruction with fellow educators through a Job Embedded Professional Learning approach. Literacy learning labs that Phyllis... Read More →
SP

Staci Puzio

Administrator, Instructional Technology, Testing and Evaluation, Clarkston Community School


Saturday October 11, 2014 12:15pm - 2:15pm
Room 10
  • Room Room 10

12:45pm

Strand B Lunch
Saturday October 11, 2014 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

1:30pm

Qualities of Effective Professional Learning Communities
A marker of effective learning communities is the quality of conversations among its members—how they learn from and with one another in their everyday interactions. This session will feature emerging research at Project Zero about the types of language professionals use to best support the learning of their colleagues.

Presenters
avatar for Daniel Wilson

Daniel Wilson

Director, Project Zero
Dr. Daniel Wilson is the Director of Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE). He is a Principal Investigator at Project Zero, a Lecturer at HGSE, Faculty for the Doctorate for Educational Leadership program at HGSE, and the Educational Chair at Harvard’s... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Theater
  • Room Theater

1:30pm

Slow Looking
Slow looking means taking the time to carefully observe more than meets the eye. It involves lingering, looking long, and purposefully going beyond first impressions.  Several PZ frameworks emphasize slow looking. This session explores how slow looking supports complex cognition, and introduces some strategies for teaching slow looking.

Presenters
avatar for Shari Tishman

Shari Tishman

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
Shari Tishman is a Lecturer at Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Senior Research Associate at Harvard Project Zero, where she recently served as Director. Her research focuses on the development of thinking and understanding, the role of close observation in learning, and... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Dance Studio
  • Room Dance Studio

1:30pm

Studio Habits of Mind
Since its inception in 2003, the Studio Thinking Framework has been used nationally and internationally in a wide variety of ways. This session explores those different approaches: what it can be used for, the value added of including it in your practice, and new ways people may be developing for its use even as we speak!


Saturday October 11, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Drafting and Design
  • Room Drafting and Design

1:30pm

The Good Project: Promoting Excellence, Engagement and Ethics in Young People
In this session, we will focus on the practical applications of the Good Project, developed to encourage young people to think about, articulate and reflect on excellence, ethics and engagement in their work and lives. Moving from theory to practice, the Good Project has developed materials such as the GoodWork Toolkit, the Collaboration Toolkit, and the Family Dinner Four-Week Program for educators, parents and others to create opportunities for important discussions with young people about the way they choose to spend time and approach work. After a brief introduction to some of these materials, participants can discuss how they may use them in their own settings and ask related questions about development and implementation.

Presenters
WF

Wendy Fischman

Project Manager, Project Zero


Saturday October 11, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Room A
  • Room Room A

1:30pm

When Change Has Legs
Come hear about and contribute to a discussion of a four-part framework for initiating and sustaining school change, based on the experiences of leaders in education from a number of different contexts around the world.

Presenters
avatar for David N. Perkins

David N. Perkins

Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
David Perkins is the Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr., Research Professor of Teaching and Learning at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, recently retired from the Senior Faculty. He has conducted long-term programs of research and development in the areas of teaching and learning for... Read More →
avatar for Jim Reese

Jim Reese

Director, Professional Development Collaborative, Washington International School
I am the founding Director of the Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School. Prior to taking on this role, I was Director of Studies for grades 6-12 at WIS and occasionally taught an English course. I have been working as a consultant with Project Zero... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Wood Shop
  • Room Woodshop

1:30pm

What is Agency by Design?
Agency by Design is a multi-year research project exploring the promises and pedagogies of maker-centered learning. Join a member of the research team in a discussion about the core questions guiding this research, the methods for exploration, and some emergent findings around maker-centered practices.

Presenters
avatar for Edward Clapp

Edward Clapp

Senior Research Manager, Project Zero
Edward P. Clapp is a senior research manager and a member of the core research team working on the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative—an investigation of the promises, practices, and pedagogies of maker-centered learning—at Project Zero, an educational research center at the Harvard... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 1:30pm - 11:30pm
Physics
  • Room Physics

2:15pm

PM BREAK
Saturday October 11, 2014 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

2:30pm

Panel -- Civic Education in the Digital Age, moderated by Carrie James
Facebook, Twitter and other digital tools provide new, and arguably unprecedented, opportunities for youth to participate in public life. These new opportunities–and the ways in which youth are taking them up–suggest a need for new approaches to civic education. In this plenary session, members of the Educating for Participatory Politics (EPP) network will explore the important role schools and educators can play in redesigning how we prepare students for civic and political participation given the digital age.

Moderators
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.

Presenters
YW

Young Whan Choi

Young Whan Choi graduated Magna Cum Laude from Brown University and has his Master’s in Teacher Education from Teachers College. A desire to serve students of color and those most disenfranchised in our educational system is at the heart of his work. He has led the development... Read More →
avatar for Erica Hodgin

Erica Hodgin

Associate Director, Civic Engagement Research Group
Erica Hodgin is the Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Research Group (CERG) at Mills College and the Research Director of the Educating for Participatory Politics project -- an action group of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP... Read More →
JK

Joseph Kahne

Professor, University of California, Riverside
Joseph Kahne is a Professor of Education at Mills College. He is also Chair of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP). Joe’s research examines ways participation with digital media is shaping and re-shaping youth civic and political engagement. He... Read More →
JP

Johanna Paraiso

Johanna Paraiso has taught English Language Arts to 11th and 12th graders at Fremont High School in Oakland for the past decade. Before that, she taught English at Boston Community Leadership Academy. Jo received her B.A. in English from UC Berkeley and her M.A. in Education from... Read More →


Saturday October 11, 2014 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Theater
  • Room Theater

4:00pm

Travel Time
Saturday October 11, 2014 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

4:15pm

Book Signing and Reception
Saturday October 11, 2014 4:15pm - 6:00pm
Cafeteria and Courtyard
  • Room Cafeteria Courtyard
 
Sunday, October 12
 

9:00am

Framing of Day
Presenters
avatar for Jim Reese

Jim Reese

Director, Professional Development Collaborative, Washington International School
I am the founding Director of the Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School. Prior to taking on this role, I was Director of Studies for grades 6-12 at WIS and occasionally taught an English course. I have been working as a consultant with Project Zero... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:00am - 9:30am
Theater
  • Room Theater

9:30am

AM BREAK
Sunday October 12, 2014 9:30am - 9:45am
Lick-Wilmerding High School 755 Ocean Boulevard, San Francisco, CA 94112

9:45am

A Beautiful Mess: Where Thinking Routines and Cultures of Thinking Collide
How can we use evidence of student learning to strengthen our classroom's culture of thinking? Participants will be invited to examine what happens when the themes of Building a Culture of Thinking and Making Thinking and Learning Visible collide. Participants will use thinking routines to explore student thinking while also reflecting on their own classroom cultures and thinkers. We will examine multiple examples of authentic student learning to gain insight into how it contributes to our class culture. We will also learn how educators can allow for students to help shape class culture by identifying pivotal points in their thinking, providing opportunities for further student-driven investigation, and inviting personal reflection on learning.

Presenters
avatar for Jodi Bossio

Jodi Bossio

English as a Second Language Coordinator / Language and Literature Teacher, DC International School
Jodi Bossio has been working as an educator for over 12 years in urban settings and has taught students in first grade through postgraduate education. She has a Master’s degree in education and is highly qualified in both English as a Second Language and English Teaching, with a... Read More →
avatar for Kristen Kullberg

Kristen Kullberg

Ars Integration Instructional Coach, Sacred Heart Bilingual School
Kristen Kullberg is the middle school Language Arts teacher and Arts Integration Instructional Coach at Sacred Heart School in Washington, DC.  Her dual role has allowed her to learn alongside students in PreK3 through 8th grade as they develop close looking, critical thinking, and... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room B
  • Room Room B

9:45am

Building a Culture of Thinking: Routines, Structures, Strategies and ‘Stick-to-itiveness’
This interactive course will explore the dimensions of a culture of thinking in a school and a school district. The instructors, both leaders in a public school district in Michigan, will ask participants to view both direct classroom and school examples of a culture of thinking, engage in thinking routines, and explore their own perspectives on how and where learning thrives. The session will include video examples from classrooms, descriptions of thinking routines, and examples/artifacts from the Clarkston Community Schools.

Presenters
avatar for Nancy Mahoney

Nancy Mahoney

Principal, Springfield Plains Elementary School
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 9
  • Room Room 9

9:45am

Creating a Collaborative Learning Environment through Design
How should I arrange the furniture in this room? How can we reduce polluted water run off on this street? How can we develop a toilet that is usable in developing countries? Design is an inherently visible thinking process that encourages varied, divergent and creative solutions to problems of all scales. The National Building Museum’s Teen Programs engage local students in the issues and problems that impact their city and their lives, and shows them a pathway to being actively engaged in solving problems. In this session, participants will experience how these programs use collaborative, hands-on, real-world design challenges by exploring and identifying local design challenges in or near the Lick-Wilmerding High School. Based on their observations and research, teams of participants will work collaboratively to propose solutions to those challenges and produce concept boards and models that demonstrate their design process. They will present their ideas to the group and receive feedback as a means of improving their solutions and making connections to the wider community. Throughout the session, they will be practicing the habits of mind and methodologies that design inculcates: integrating information with personal opinion, linking solutions to lived experience, and emphasizing the iterative nature of creative problem-solving.

Presenters
AC

Andrew Costanzo

Teen Programs Manager, National Building Museum


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room D
  • Room Room D

9:45am

Creating a Community of Thinkers: Visible Thinking as a Tool
In this course participants will experience how to build a culture of thinking in the whole community around a school—including students, teachers, leaders and parents—and how to sustain it when ”core” teachers leave. We will focus on the importance of inviting teachers as well as parents into the process of making thinking visible in the classroom. Participants will be introduced to a number of thinking routines that can be used in different settings, in all subjects, and in social situations with students, at faculty meetings and at parent meetings. Participants will also have the opportunity to collaboratively develop their thinking about how to start and/or deepen the work with Visible Thinking at their schools.

Presenters
LN

Lotta Norell

Educator, NUKAB
Lotta Norell has been a teacher for many, many years. Now she is educating teachers, mostly in Sweden, about Visible Thinking. Lotta was the coordinator for the project” Making Thinking Visible” at Lemshaga Academy, Sweden 2000-2005. That was the beginning of Visible Thinking. Lotta... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Dance Studio
  • Room Dance Studio

9:45am

Cultivating a New Generation of Learners
This course focuses on today’s learner. Participants will be invited to contrast traditional notions of learning with one informed by closer attention to the eight cultural forces in the classroom identified by Ron Ritchhart in Making Thinking Visible. The course will highlight these cultural forces, while also exploring the elements of a tool called the Understanding Map, which gives direction for teachers and students on a learning journey. Stops along the map will provide an opportunity to deepen our understanding of how learners learn and become more open to taking risks.

Presenters
KS

Karen Sinclair

4th grade Teacher, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools
JY

Jodi Yeloushan

Principal, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Writing Lab
  • Room Writing Lab

9:45am

Developing a Sensitivity to Design: Thinking Critically about the Made Dimensions of our World
Educational initiatives that emphasize making, design and tinkering are becoming increasingly popular in K-12 education. Through afterschool programs, technology classes and integrated maker classes, new pedagogies are aimed at encouraging young people to “learn to make” and “make to learn.” In this course, researchers from Project Zero and collaborating practitioners will present the teaching and learning opportunities offered by maker-centered experiences. Participants will engage in a series of hands-on activities with the goals of cultivating observation skills and encouraging critical analysis of the made dimensions of our world. Presenters will draw on Project Zero’s Agency by Design project, which is conducting research through interviews, site visits and action research with partnering prek-12 schools in Oakland, CA.

Presenters
JR

Jen Ryan

Researcher, Project Manager, Project Zero


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Tech Arts Studio 1
  • Room Tech Arts Studio 1

9:45am

Discourse in the Cultures of Thinking Classroom 
How do conversation, language and discussion in a “culture of thinking” classroom differ from the notion of a traditional classroom? How do we understand effective discourse patterns, versus ineffective ones, so that we as teachers can better foster powerful learning communities? This course, led by Project Zero researcher Ron Ritchhart, will focus on current research conducted by the Cultures of Thinking research team at Project Zero in the area of discourse. Drawing on current work in the field, this session will allow participants to examine practices that can help teachers at all grade levels and across subject areas create a culture of thinking and that encourage deep understanding in students. Participants will explore the way educators can use thinking routines designed to facilitate thinking while structuring the discourse of the classroom.

Presenters
avatar for Ron Ritchhart

Ron Ritchhart

Principal Investigator, HGSE Project Zero
Ron Ritchhart is a Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Harvard Project Zero where his work focuses on the development of school and classroom culture as prime vehicles for developing students’ as powerful thinkers and learners.  Ron’s most recent book, Creating... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room C
  • Room Room C

9:45am

Empowering Disenfranchised Learners: A Collaborative Approach to Making Thinking Verbal
In this session, we invite participants to construct shared knowledge, both figuratively and literally, as we develop the “head, heart, and hands of students," exploring ways to scaffold the development of metacognition, creativity, listening and speaking skills. A highly-engaging team approach to eliciting student discourse and thinking, Enbrighten, will be examined. Participants will make thinking verbal, exploring comprehension as a collaborative process of cognition, rather than something assessed by an isolated set of comprehension questions. As part of this process, learners will be encouraged to uncover complex issues of global significance from a variety of viewpoints. We will model and practice the language of reflective listening and collaborative discourse, demonstrating how students develop and generalize these habits. Participants will build with learning toolkits, document collective thinking, view classroom videos and engage in collective discussions.

Presenters
avatar for Erika Lusky

Erika Lusky

Special Educator, Instructional Coach, CCoT Online Learning Coach, Rochester Community Schools
I am passionate about creating quality relationships to foster agency and identity, specifically in disenfranchised learners. I am advocate for human connections, understanding, thinking, and student voice. I have been working for Rochester Community Schools in Michigan for over 20... Read More →
avatar for Julie Rains

Julie Rains

Information Literacy Specialist & AbD Online Course Instructor
Passionate about fostering positive interactions and relationships, I am committed to collaborating with students and teachers from around the world. It is a true joy to experiment, investigate, and grapple with ideas to encourage reflection from a variety of viewpoints. In addition... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 5
  • Room Room 5

9:45am

Flattening the Globe: The Challenge and Beauty of Multiple Perspectives
How do we represent our 3D earth in two dimensions? In this session, participants will engage in a mathematical/artistic problem-solving project that has multiple solutions. Using the eight creative strategies found in contemporary arts practice and the precision of math, participants will think through and execute a process of flattening a 3D globe to a 2D map. All maps are distorted and offer ways of understanding bias and systems thinking of social complexities. This course will demonstrate how to use maps to tell a narrative from different points of view. The practice of remodeling and recontextualizing the globe will open and extend the ways we use mathematical practices to advance our creative inquiry. In addition to gaining an understanding of the purpose of commonly used map projections (cylindrical, conical, planar, and interrupted projections), participants will create new maps that expose our personal stories, perspectives and identities grounded in the mathematical practices and creative strategies for critically engaging in this work. The presenters will make reference to principles from Project Zero research into teaching for understanding, studio habits of mind and making learning visible.

Presenters
ML

Mariah Landers

Director, Integrated Learning Specialist Program, Alameda County Office of Education
TP

Tamar Posner

President, Mathaction.org


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 6
  • Room Room 6

9:45am

Flip History!: Personalized Inquiry into History through Unpacking a Modern Memorial
The overall goal of this course is for participants to understand how they can develop an entire inquiry unit on a historical period by looking at a memorial today. The intended inquiry will flip the traditional teaching of history towards an inquiry-based approach led by the learners. Participants will interactively ‘unpack’ a historical event or historical period by actively exploring a historic memorial. They will virtually explore the memorial making their thinking visible using a Project Zero thinking routine and then create their own concept questions. The course will conclude by having participants design their own memorial.

Presenters
AH

Arndt Häfele

Grade 5 teacher / Grade Level Leader Grade 5, Atlanta International School


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 10
  • Room Room 10

9:45am

From Puppets to Robots: STEAM (Science, Technology, Education, Arts, Mathematics), Maker Education and Design Thinking as Inclusive, Engaging, Self-Differentiating
Maker Education and Design Thinking have been gaining more traction and credibility in educational settings. In this course, the presenter will share the story of From Puppets to Robots, a curriculum that was implemented with elementary and middle school students. The unit fouses on exploring human movements and ways they can be incorporated into making puppets and simple robots. Later lessons build on student knowledge of human movement to explore and build robots to create a positive impact on humankind. After engaging in a short overview about making and design thinking, participants will use basic craft materials to construct robotic arms, and then progress into using technology to help with the design and making process, concluding with the construction of robotic prototypes–exploring and discussing along the way how these activities support and promote design thinking and making.

Presenters
avatar for Jackie Gerstein

Jackie Gerstein

Gifted Teacher and EdTech Adjunct Faculty, SFPS and Boise State University
My byline is, “I don’t do teaching for a living. I live teaching as my doing . . . and technology has amplified my passion for doing so.” I teach elementary gifted students. I teach graduate courses in Educational Technology for Boise State, Walden, and Western’s Governors... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Lower Bio/Chem
  • Room Lower Biology/Chemistry

9:45am

Global Competence Begins in Preschool: The Urgency of Nurturing Empathy
How can we transform our early childhood classrooms so that they nurture global thinkers? How do recognizing the way the mind regulates emotions and the way emotions affect other people shape empathetic preschoolers? This course offers opportunities to analyze how thinking routines engage preschoolers in the nurturing of global habits of mind that enable them to listen with empathy and think flexibly as they attempt to see the world through the perspectives of others. Special emphasis will be given to how preschoolers become aware of their own emotions, as well as to how to manage their emotions and the emotions of others. We will also discuss how they learn about the relationship between the brain and the mind.

Presenters
avatar for Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Instructor, Florida International University
AM

Andrea Muñoz

Preschool Teacher, The Joy of Learning Educational Center


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 7
  • Room Room 7

9:45am

Imagination, Expression, Reflection: Creating a Mixed Media Book
The Visual Arts Department teaching team at Lick-Wilmerding invites educators from all subjects to participate in this hands-on studio workshop. Focusing on three specific habits of mind—imagination, expression and reflection—participants will engage in a creative process of making a mixed media book in response to a short text. Participants will be asked to avoid “illustrating” and encouraged instead to explore and experiment with a variety of media, familiar and new, to discover how spontaneity, improvisation and even error can lead to deeper thinking and potentially original solutions. As they create participants will be asked to think like an artist and to reflect on the abiding question,“How do I enter unseen territory?” The course will introduce practical skills and methods, inspired by Project Zero philosophies and Artful Thinking routines, educators can take back to their classrooms and schools.

Presenters
LG

Lydia Greer

Visual Arts Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School
OO

oleg osipoff

Teacher in Visual Art, Lick Wilmerding High School
Teacher of Visual Art - Drawing, Painting, Mixed-Media, Printmaking, Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Videography. Member of Visual Arts Department that incorporates Habits of Mind into curriculum and teaching methods.
GP

Goranka Poljak-Hoy

Visual Arts Department Chair, Art and Architecture Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School
RS

Robert Sanborn

Visual Arts Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Art Studio
  • Room Art Studio

9:45am

Making Innovation Work with Young Students in the Classroom
In this course the presenters will share what they learned from the experience of teaching a first grade unit guided by the question, “How can we invent something to make our school community a better place?” They utilized the design process, documentation and reflection within the unit and made visible thinking and problem-solving central to the learning. Learn practical approaches to undertaking such a project in a whole-group classroom setting with young children (and without specialized tools). By the end of the unit, first graders had completed their own functioning class inventions and had the experience of being an innovator for their community. While the inventions (such as the Bathroom Bulb and Erasinator) may make us chuckle, they solved real first grade problems and were a true collaborative effort between the students and community partners showing that they can solve problems and help people through commitment and collaboration. Participants will learn by doing as well as reflect upon ways to encourage a “maker mindset” in young children.

Presenters
RM

Rachel Meyer

First Grade Teacher, The Environmental Charter School
JP

Jennifer Porter

First Grade Teacher, The Environmental Charter School


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 2
  • Room Room 2

9:45am

Making Paper Circuits: The Vital Role of Process in Maker Activities
In this hands-on course, participants will learn to combine papercraft techniques with friendly, accessible electronics materials such as copper tape, flat batteries and bead-like LED lights. This paper circuits activity will set the stage for a conversation about capturing process as a built-in part of a maker activity. With paper circuits built into a project notebook or other physical timeline, incremental “sketches” and experiments can double as functional, personalized tools to refer back to. Throughout the course, we will reflect on examples of intersections of craft and technology as both a creative “way in” to technical topics, and a “way out,” connecting material back to students’ passions.

Presenters
avatar for Natalie Freed

Natalie Freed

Computer Science Teacher, Lick-Wilmerding High School


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Electronics
  • Room Electronics

9:45am

Making Thinking Routines Visible
As teachers of adolescents, we may assume that our students will recognize the design of our lesson plan and topics we want them to understand from the sequence of activities we plan for them. We assume that students will see the invisible seam that binds our teacher thinking. Thinking routines can make that invisible seam visible and give students the tools to innovate and explore, to become autonomous learners, and to engage in substantive conversations about ideas and concepts. In this course, we will examine how thinking routines can be modeled effectively and how students can use them. We will focus on three particular routines and examine a piece of literature through the practice of these routines, watch a student discussion based on a routine and hear students reflect on the ways they use routines. Although this workshop will use a piece of imaginative literature as a text, the session is equally applicable to any humanities, arts or social science class.

Presenters
JS

Jennifer Selvin

English Department Chair, Lick-Wilmerding High School


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Upper Biology
  • Room Upper Biology

9:45am

Making Thinking Visible in the Science Classroom
How do you know that your students don't leave your evolution unit still thinking that a lizard camouflages with a branch because it plans and wants to blend with its environment? This course will showcase various methods of making thinking and learning visible in the science classroom. Popular and widely used curricula for labs and activities are often educational but can be very prescriptive. Students don't play as much of a role as they could in noticing patterns and phenomena, documenting their rudimentary thoughts and explanations, developing their own questions and constructing their own knowledge. In this course, participants will experience and discuss various strategies for helping students track and reflect upon the evolution of their thinking and learning about science concepts. In all of the examples, there is a requisite element of pushing students to consider practical, ethical and global implications

Presenters
avatar for Carrie Maslow

Carrie Maslow

Science Teacher/ Science Department Chair, Lick-Wilmerding High School
Carrie Maslow has taught Biology, Anatomy and Physiology and Psychology at the high school level for over a decade. She began her teaching career in an outdoor school and always strives to make learning as experiential and student-centered as possible. Carrie earned her undergraduate... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Upper Chemistry
  • Room Upper Chemistry

9:45am

Making Thinking Visible with Technology
"It's not about the technology. It's about learning." Workshop participants will learn to develop opportunities for students to make their thinking visible with technology (MTVT). With freely available Web 2.0 tools and social media students can engage in thinking routines to provide evidence of their thinking and demonstrate their understanding of course content in multiple ways (images, audio, video, presentations, artwork and more). Lessons and activities that integrate the thinking routines with technology often simultaneously incorporate 21st century skills. Thus, Making Thinking Visible with Technology (MTVT) provides opportunities to weave together many of the tenets and best practices featured in myriad educational innovations and reform measures. Such lessons and activities can promote higher-order thinking skills and deep reflection, increased student engagement, technology integration, creativity, digital citizenship, evidence of student performance and understanding, along with related curriculum and content standards. Given that teachers often voice concern about about the lack of time to incorporate all of these various standards, skills, topics and techniques into their classes, rather than trying to "cover" each of these in isolation, MTVT helps us to engage students in rich learning opportunities where these elements support and complement one another. In David Perkins’s words, it's an opportunity to make learning whole. Participants will learn about the MTVT framework, design lessons and collect practical tips.

Presenters
avatar for Clif Mims

Clif Mims

Professor, University of Memphis
Clif Mims is a teacher, researcher, author, speaker and educational consultant specializing in the effective integration of technology with teaching and learning. He is a native of the Mississippi Delta and has more than 25 years of teaching experience. He taught elementary and middle... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Computer Lab
  • Room Computer Lab

9:45am

Nurturing Global Competence Through the Use of Global Thinking Routines
The challenge is clear: The most pressing problems of our time—from climate change to mass migration, human rights to equitable economic development—demand global awareness and collaboration. They demand that we educate our youth to investigate complex topics of global significance, to recognize and seek to understand a variety of perspectives, to communicate across difference and, when appropriate, to take informed action. How can we transform our classrooms into spaces where students engage with the contemporary world beyond their immediate environment? For decades, researchers at Project Zero have examined the role of thinking routines in the promotion of cultures of thinking and thinking dispositions. In this course, we explore a novel approach to thinking routines—global thinking routines—specifically designed to advance learners’ (children as well as adults) global competence. Through a combination of brief presentations, small group work and class discussion of student work and contemporary issues, participants will develop their understanding of what global competence is, what it might look like, and why it matters today. Participants will gain firsthand experience of global thinking routines and have the opportunity to think with other educators about how they might be used in creating globally-minded classroom cultures and advancing students’ (and teachers’) global competence.

Presenters
avatar for Melissa Rivard

Melissa Rivard

Senior Project Manager, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Melissa Rivard is Senior Project Manager on the Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) initiative, supporting the Center’s strategy for creating and testing new innovations. She is the project lead for the Washington and Georgia state innovation clusters, in addition to supporting the addition of new projects to the Center’s FOI portfolio. Melissa joined the Center in December 2015. Prior to coming to the Center, she worked at Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education as a Project Manager and Pedagogical Documen... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Library
  • Room Library

9:45am

Promoting Visible Thinking Through Digital Documentation of Learning
What are the challenges and benefits of documenting thinking through video? Which frameworks are useful for telling stories of learning? Participants in this course will engage in meaningful discussion about effective practices for the documentation process, inspired by the ongoing work in Reggio Emilia, Italy, preschools and at Project Zero. By critically examining existing examples, participants will explore the dispositions that lend themselves well to collaborative documentation and deepen their own understanding of what is working well in the classroom and what needs improvement. Participants will also develop action plans for documenting a visible thinking activity in their work setting and will be able to make informed decisions about intended audience.

Presenters
avatar for Richard Anderson

Richard Anderson

Director of Information Services, Washington International School
Richard Anderson is the Director of Information Services at Washington International School. He became a Certified Google Education Trainer in 2011 and is passionate about using Google Apps to improve workflows and encourage collaboration among all members of the school community... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 4
  • Room Room 4

9:45am

Service Learning for Global Competence: Perspectives and Strategies from High School and College
Service learning is a hands-on, holistically enriching strategy for developing global competence without leaving the country. This course will explore how two institutions–the University of Southern California's Joint Educational Project and the Jewish Community High School of the Bay–seek to enrich service by applying theoretical and conceptual understandings and by encountering the lived realities of others. While the institutions differ in terms of student populations, length of engagement and service sites, both rely upon academic preparation, community partnerships and thoughtful reflection. Course participants will identify the synergies between service learning and global competence and brainstorm service learning projects for their own students, analyzing if/how these projects scaffold their students' global awareness as well as cultivate their heads, hearts and hands.

Presenters
RB

Roni Ben-David

Director of Student Activities and Community Outreach; Jewish Studies Teacher, Jewish Community High School of the Bay
avatar for Laurel Felt

Laurel Felt

Project Curriculum & Learning Designer, Mattel
As a Project Curriculum & Learning Designer at Mattel, I support the Child Development & Learning team in establishing world-class learning content and curriculum and activating child development and learning expertise across Mattel, all in the pursuit of helping children and families... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Physics
  • Room Physics

9:45am

Service Learning in the Classroom: Private Skills for a Public Purpose
In this course, we will look at service through the lens of a maker and explore how students at Lick-Wilmerding live the mission of the school (“A Private School with a Public Purpose”), utilizing their shop skills to: (1) learn and understand the social and racial inequities of our society as well as the history of private vs. public schools; (2) build for others with empathy and competency; and (3) further develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills with real world issues. Participants will explore different scenarios that students can face when developing new relationships within our school and outside organizations.

Presenters
YF

Youssou Fall

Technical Art Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School
GT

Giles Thompson

Technical Art Teacher, Lick Wilmerding High School


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Wood Shop
  • Room Woodshop

9:45am

Students and Teachers as Contemporary Artists: Using the Studio Thinking Framework to Shape Practice
Educators, Arzu Mistry and Todd Elkin believe there are many overlaps in the pro-active processes and meaning-making of contemporary artists, and the practices of progressive educators. In this course they will use the Studio Thinking Framework , created through research at Project Zero, as a lens for examining teacher and student practice in an arts-centered curriculum. The ‘Studio Habits of Mind’ give teachers and learners a culturally responsive common language to illuminate and describe moments of artistic thinking, reflection and learning, and can act as an effective lens for looking at and planning curriculum and assessment. The four ‘Studio Structures’ enable teachers to design powerful and deep classroom learning. In this course we will introduce the framework through arts experiences, share pictures of practice from student and teacher perspectives, and discuss the use of the framework in building contemporary arts practices from elementary to high school classrooms. Participants will explore how this framework can be used to support students in developing deep understanding across arts and other academic disciplines.


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Drafting and Design
  • Room Drafting and Design

9:45am

The GoodProject: Ideas and Tools for a Good Life
How can we encourage individuals to carry out their work and life in new ways that are ethical and that advance the human condition? This course will introduce participants to a sampling of the research and practical materials of The Good Project, which for almost 20 years has worked to identify and learn from individuals and institutions that exemplify "good work"—work that is high quality, ethical and personally meaningful—and ways this work relates to collaboration, quality, trust and trustworthiness, digital ethics, participation in the civic and public spheres, and even family dinner at home. Participants will experience practical applications used with students and educators of all ages, in various educational contexts, all over the world. Explore how to help students to think about ethical dilemmas they face in their work and to collaborate with others in meaningful ways. Investigate ways to help educators think about how they structure their time, and how technology may or may not influence the use of "time well spent." This course will help participants think about ways to best prepare students to be caring people, ethical workers and engaged citizens today and in the future. Come prepared to talk, listen and engage in hands-on activities about these important topics.

Presenters
WF

Wendy Fischman

Project Manager, Project Zero


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
The Center
  • Room The Center

9:45am

Thinking, Understanding and Reflecting Through Art and Literature
Learning thrives when students’ thinking is made visible and when there is time for student collaboration. This interactive course will give participants the opportunity to experience and learn about how using thinking routines with art and literature can enhance students’ thinking, understanding and reflection in an elementary classroom setting. Viewing documentation of student learning as they use these routines, participants will develop a sense of the way these students progress in their understanding of the theme "Risks and Consequences" and in the process gain an understanding of their own and others' perspectives, while developing respect and empathy for others.

Presenters
avatar for Tabbatha O'Donnell

Tabbatha O'Donnell

Upper Elementary Division Lead, Meyer Academy
Tabbatha O’Donnell is an elementary teacher with over 20 years of experience in grades K-5. She began her teaching career in Hawaii where she immersed in Hawaii’s multicultural environment, leading to a unique approach and sensitivity to teaching with a global perspective. Currently... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 8
  • Room Room 8

9:45am

Tinkering with Words: The Art of Haiku
How do we help our students slow down, observe the world closely and develop descriptive language? How do we encourage a thinking-through-making approach to writing? Educators from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will present practical strategies for connecting poetry and art using a thinking routine to encourage careful observation and creative interpretation. The session will include an introduction to the art of haiku and its relationship to maker thinking. Looking at a work of art, instructors will model a routine that supports students’ observation and description skills. They will demonstrate how to creatively compose haiku, including collaborative editing and revising. Working both individually and collaboratively, participants will physically break down their poems into the essential building blocks–words. Through the thoughtful and playful act of tinkering, experimenting and manipulating, participants will generate stronger literary works of art. Slowing down and actively engaging with a work of art through careful observation, creative writing and collaboration provides an authentic learning experience where thoughtful writing represents complex thinking. With interdisciplinary applications, this model can be used in classroom, museum and professional development contexts.

Presenters
avatar for Nathalie Ryan

Nathalie Ryan

Senior Educator and Manager, Gallery and Studio Learning, National Gallery of Art
Nathalie Ryan is an educator at the National Gallery of Art, Washington (DC), where she has coordinated and taught in-gallery and studio programs for all ages since 2002. She received her Ed.M. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, M.A. in art history from The University... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room A
  • Room Room A

9:45am

Visible Thinking in the Second Language Acquisition Process: A Natural Environment for Communication
In this course participants will experience how to build a culture of thinking in the foreign language classroom, practicing how to develop learning opportunities that encourage students to cultivate dispositions, not merely test-taking abilities. The instructors, both Spanish teachers, will offer examples of teaching and learning experiences using Visible Thinking routines in the foreign language classroom, including reflections from students about how these routines have helped them to contextualize their language use as well as lowered their affective filters towards their practice. The intention is to show how Visible Thinking routines can promote a positive attitude for foreign language learners who too often find themselves trapped in frustrating "right or wrong" mind frames.

Presenters
avatar for Carmen Samanes

Carmen Samanes

MYP Coordinator/Teacher, Atlanta International School
Carmen Samanes is a MYP curriculum coordinator and Spanish/Humanities Teachers at Atlanta International School with eighteen years of International education experience. She is interested in language acquisition research. In order to help students learn better and become more thoughtful... Read More →
avatar for Elena Zapico

Elena Zapico

Spanish Teacher, Atlanta International School
I am a Spanish teacher dedicated to create a Culture of Thinking that transforms the way Foreign Languages are learned and used in and beyond the classroom setting. Besides teaching, I am completing my PhD in Literature through the University of Salamanca, Spain. When I don´t... Read More →


Sunday October 12, 2014 9:45am - 11:45am
Room 1
  • Room Room 1

11:45am

Panel -- Project Zero in the World, moderated by Jim Reese
As Project Zero nears its 50th anniversary, its influence is felt in schools, museums and other educational institutions around the world. In this closing plenary session, hear from three educational leaders who have made a lasting impact guiding the implementation of Project Zero ideas in various settings.

Moderators
avatar for Jim Reese

Jim Reese

Director, Professional Development Collaborative, Washington International School
I am the founding Director of the Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School. Prior to taking on this role, I was Director of Studies for grades 6-12 at WIS and occasionally taught an English course. I have been working as a consultant with Project Zero... Read More →

Presenters
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
ET

Eric Temple

Principal, Lick Wilmerding High School
BT

Brooke Toczylowski

Oakland International High School


Sunday October 12, 2014 11:45am - 12:30pm
Theater
  • Room Theater